THE BEET: Volume 14, Winter Letter 4

Greetings from Windflower Farm!

Your final vegetable delivery of the winter season is scheduled to arrive in your neighborhood this coming Saturday, February 6th. 

What’s in your share? You’ve got another hefty box coming your way! You’ll get a butternut squash or two and bags of potatoes (reds or yellows or purples, or perhaps a mix), sweet potatoes, yellow onions, red onions, carrots, rutabagas and beets. The yellow potatoes are particularly good roasted. The purple potatoes are drier, and are better fried or baked. Rutabagas can be eaten mashed, like potatoes, pan fried like turnips or scalloped potatoes, or roasted along with other root crops in light oil and salt. Salvador and Candelaria love them, and are reminded of the jicama at home in Central Mexico. You’ll get two bags of greens from our unheated greenhouses – one containing spinach and the other Dinosaur and Red Russian kales. The spinach needs washing, but it will likely keep better if stored without washing. The Red Russian kale should be eaten right away. You’ll get a bag of Empire apples from the Borden farm. And you’ll get a jar of jam made by Sara and Victoria from elderberries wild crafted from the farm’s swampier hedgerows or our own organic strawberry crop. There are just a few jars of the jam made using elderberries, and we’ve marked boxes containing those jars with the letter E. Bon appetite!

Thank you very much for being with us - we hope you have enjoyed your share of our fall and winter harvests. We look forward to seeing you in the spring! 

Warm regards, Ted and Jan

 

THE BEET: Volume 14, Winter Letter 3

Greetings from Windflower Farm and Happy New Year! 

 

Pick Up at: 35 Irving Place

2:30-4pm Please be on time.

 

What’s in your share? You’ve got a hefty box coming your way! You’ll get a bag each of yellow potatoes and mixed reds. You’ll get a bag of sweet potatoes and a bag of assorted yellow and red onions and either a garlic bulb or shallots. You’ll get a butternut squash. You’ll get a bag of carrots and beets and another of either daikon radishes or purple top turnips. Remember, when all else fails, simply puree those turnips and add them to soup stock. Or, chop them, sprinkle with oil and salt, place them on a baking dish along with some of these other root vegetables, and roast them. You’ll get three bags of greens, including Koji, Red Russian kale and Dinosaur kale. You’ll get a bag of the Borden’s apples that will contain Jonagolds (the red-orange-yellow variety) and either Ida Reds or Empires (both of which are crispy and dark red). And you’ll get a half-gallon of the Borden’s excellent cider. We hope you enjoy your share!

Your optional items, including eggs through our farm’s partners, frozen shares from Winter Sun and/or pre-ordered items from Lewis Waite Farm, will be available at the same time.

Your next winter delivery will take place on February 6th. Our best wishes for the New Year!

Warm regards, Ted and Jan


Winter Reading

 

Looking for something inspirational and informative to read during these sometimes chilly days?  

I recently picked up a copy of ANIMAL, VEGETABLE, MIRACLE by Barbara Kingsolver.  It's Excellent.  Barbara Kingslover- is a well known fiction writer, but this book is her first non-fiction; and documents a year in her life- when she, her husband and their 2 children live entirely off what they are able to grow in their own garden- or purchase items that were produced within 50 miles of their home.  In addition to their interesting story, her book is well researched and offers a lot of information on food production in this country, CAFO's, the structure and history of small family farms, and how to start your own home garden.  

Here is the book's website, which also offers some of the seasonal recipes her family used and developed over the year.

I also just finished WALKING ON WATER: READING, WRITING AND REVOLUTION by Derrick Jensen, which was definitely the best book I read in 2015.  Jensen is a creative writing teacher in San Diego, but offers poignant insights about our culture and future on this earth while walking the readers and his students through our current systems of teaching, learning and writing.

One of the great failings of our culture is the nearly universal belief that there can be anything universal. We as a culture take the same approach to living in Phoenix as in Seattle as in Miami, to the detriment of all of these landscapes. We believe that students can be given standard lesson plans and standard tests, universally applied, to the detriment of all of these students. We turn living wild trees into standardized two-by-fours. We turn living fish into fish sticks. We turn living carrots into carrot sticks. Every fish is different from every other fish. Every tree is different from every other tree. Every student is different from every other student. Every place is different from every other place. If we are ever to remember what it is to be human beings, and if we are ever to hope to begin to live sustainably in place (which is the only way to live sustainably), we will have to remember that specificity is everything. It’s the only thing we’ve got.
— Derrick Jensen

THE BEET: Volume 14, Winter Letter 2

Hello from Windflower Farm and Happy Winter!

Pick Up at: 35 Irving Place

2:30-4pm Please be on time.

What’s in your share? The unusually warm weather has been wonderful for getting work done this fall and for producing a healthy crop of greens. You’ll be getting Red Russian kale, Dinosaur kale and Koji. They can all be eaten as fresh salad greens or they can be braised or added to soups. A day doesn’t go by here when we don’t eat these nutritious greens in one way or another. I’ve posted a few photographs of today’s harvest to our Instagram account (@Windflowerfarm). You’ll be getting the following from our root cellars: a net bag of sweet potatoes, a butternut squash or two, a net bag of red and yellow “Irish” potatoes, a plastic bagful of carrots and beets, some leeks, a net bag of yellow onions, a paper bag with yellow shallots and red Cipollini onions, and a plastic bag containing assorted small fennel bulbs, a kohlrabi or two and a handful of salad turnips. These last items are excellent for adding to a pan of roasted vegetables. Turnips, in particular, are an easy thing to have too many of. One of the best ways to use them up is in the making of soup stock. You’ll also be getting a bag with Empire and McIntosh apples from the Borden Farm (the Empires are the darker variety) and a jar of jam made by our own Sara and Victoria.  

Your vegetables and fruit will arrive in a one-bushel box that you are welcome to take home with you. If you are able to recycle them, please do so, alternatively, we’d be happy to take them back at some point during the winter.  

Your optional items, including eggs through our farm’s partners, frozen shares from Winter Sun and/or pre-ordered items from Lewis Waite Farm, will be available at the same time (with the exception of Lewis-Waite items in Washington Hts., for which there is a separate delivery time and place). 

Your next winter delivery will take place on January 9th. Our best wishes for the Holiday Season.

Warm regards, Ted and Jan


Windflower Farm this Fall

Windflower Farm this Fall

THE BEET: Volume 14, Winter Letter 1

Hello Winter Share members,

Hope all of you are looking forward to your First Pick up which is this Saturday: November 21.

Pick up Location:  Clinton Hill (35 Irving Place, 2:30 to 4:00)


A note from Ted and Jan:

 

Hello from the entire Windflower Farm staff! Thank you for joining us for the winter season. We hope you enjoy your CSA shares.

If you are getting this note it is because you have signed up to receive four monthly winter boxes from Windflower Farm, the first of which is scheduled to arrive in your neighborhood this coming Saturday, November 21st. 

If you have not mailed in your payment, please do so soon or contact us to cancel. An alternative is to use PayPal or Google Wallet and send your payment to tedblomgren@gmail.com. It is our policy to send a box to everyone who has signed up, even if we have not yet received their payment, with the understanding (and hope) that anyone who has decided to cancel will do so before we pack their first box on Friday. 

We have no waiting list this year. If you have signed up for a winter share, even if you signed up after the deadline, you will be getting a share unless you cancel. 

Pickup times and locations are noted below. Please do your best to arrive within the scheduled time slot. Pickup locations are staffed by volunteers who likely have other commitments for the remainder of their Saturday. If you cannot make it to the site on time, please try to have someone else make the pickup. We at the farm can do very little to help facilitate late pickups.

Your vegetables and fruit will arrive in a one-bushel box that you are welcome to take home with you. If you are able to recycle them, please do so, alternatively, we’d be happy to take them back at some point.  

What’s in your share? Our root cellar is full and the fall has been wonderful for greens production, so your first box will be a full one! It will include a bagful of cooking greens from the field (including Dinosaur and Red Russian kale and Koji, which is a tender Asian green like tatsoi), a bagful of salad greens from the high tunnel (including mixed lettuces, arugula, radicchio and perhaps an adolescent mustard mix), and the herbs, sage and thyme. It will also include the following from our cellar: sweet potatoes, butternut squash, red and yellow “Irish” potatoes, carrots, beets, Hakurei turnips, Watermelon radishes, fennel and various onions. And it will include Honey Crisp apples and apple cider from our friends at the Borden Farm. Bon appetite!

Your optional items, including eggs through our farm, frozen shares from Winter Sun and/or pre-ordered items from the Lewis Waite Farm, will be available at the same time (with the exception of Lewis-Waite items in Washington Hts.). 

Your next winter delivery will take place On December 19th. 

Our best wishes for the Thanksgiving Holiday.

Warm regards, Ted and Jan

This week's Arugula

This week's Arugula

The Arugula just before harvest.

The Arugula just before harvest.

Packing everything up for distribution.

Packing everything up for distribution.

The BEET: Volume 14, Issue 23

IN THIS WEEK'S BEET:

  • The end of the 2016 season--join us after we close for a quick gathering to celebrate!
  • Letter from Ted, and sign up for the winter share today!

  • Volunteers needed for survey

  • Interested in joining the core? Email us!

  • One final recipe


NOTE FROM YOUR CSA CORE:

To all of our members: We are so grateful to you for joining us for the 2015 Clinton Hill CSA season. Thanks to those of you who've cheerfully volunteered your time on site and in other ways. We hope that you have enjoyed the season and had many delicious meals. Thanks for your survey input. To celebrate, we'd like to invite you to come out for a happy hour after the pickup on Thursday, November 5 (that's today!) at Fulton-Grand, which is--you probably figured this out--on the corner of Fulton and Grand. We'll be heading over there around 7:30.

All our best wishes, the Clinton Hill CSA core group


NEWS FROM WINDFLOWER FARM

CSA Delivery #22, November 5, 2015

This week’s share, your last until the winter season (a sign up link is below), will include garlic, fennel, sweet potatoes, fingerling potatoes, yellow onions, broccoli, a rutabaga or two, a winter squash, probably Butternut, your choice of kales, your choice of tatsoi or Tokyo Bekana, and adolescent Romaine lettuces. Jan and I would like to thank you for being with us this season. We hope you have enjoyed your share of our 2015 farm season. We have certainly enjoyed growing your vegetables.

We’d also like to thank the members of your core group. They are the people in your neighborhood with whom we work most closely, and without whom our CSA would cease to exist. We remain eternally grateful to them. If you have an interest in becoming more involved with the CSA, consider joining the core group. I have not had a chance to make an end-of-season survey, but I expect to. If one arrives in your email inbox, please take a few minutes to fill it out. Your thoughts really do help guide our decision-making around the farm.   

It’s time to sign up for your winter share! Help keep your farmer and his staff off the streets of Valley Falls this winter by giving them something better to do with their time. Click here to sign up. https://windflowerfarm.wufoo.com/forms/windflower-farms-20152016-winter-share/. Or read on for more information.

This year we are celebrating our tenth winter share season! The share is meant to be something of an antidote to the long winter, and includes fresh salad greens from our greenhouses, stored roots, bulbs and tubers from our root cellars, and locally grown fruits in the form of cider, berry jams and stored apples. Shares are delivered just once a month so as not to overwhelm your kitchen.

Your four monthly deliveries will include approximately 2 lb. of our organically grown greens (including spinach, kale, tatsoi and Swiss chard) about 10 lb. of our storage vegetables (including carrots, red and yellow onions, a variety of potatoes, beets, leeks, sweet potatoes, rutabagas and more), along with 4-6 lb. of fruits, and either the Borden’s apple cider or our homemade jam from our own or locally grown fruit - all packed to fit in a returnable one-bushel box. An optional egg share from neighbors raising free-range hens is also available. They are fresh brown eggs from free-range hens raised by the Brownell and Davis families, and they are raised on grass and hay and given no feed that contains GMOs, antibiotics or hormones.

Our winter deliveries will take place on four Saturdays - November 21st, December 19th, January 9th and February 6th – and are timed to coincide with the deliveries made to your CSA pickup site by Lewis-Waite Farm and Winter Sun Farm. PLEASE sign up for your winter share by November 5th, the end of our regular season.

Best wishes for a healthy and happy fall and winter season,

Ted and Jan


MORE NEWS

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Calling all volunteers! Haven't done your volunteer hours? Done your hours but looking for more CHCSA opportunities? We are in need of volunteers to compile our annual survey! This is data entry that can be done at home on your own time over the next week--a perfect opportunity for those members who have trouble finding the time to volunteer on site. If you're interested, please contact core member Roxanne Earley at roxanne.earley@gmail.com.

JOIN THE CORE GROUP! 

Come join the core! Are you interested in becoming more involved with the CSA? We'd love to hear from you! We have a position open on our core leadership group starting next spring. As you may or may not know, core members--who put in many hours over the course of the season--receive a free vegetable share, as well as the satisfaction of helping to steer the CSA and keep it going! Even if you think you don't have time, there may be a place for you. If you're interested, email us at information@clintonhillcsa.org.


ONE MORE RECIPE

What's that you say? The weather's getting colder, and you're looking for a long, slow-cooked soup? Well, I don't know a better way to use up those delicious squash, carrots, and onions than this: Baked Winter Squash Soup (slightly paraphrased from The New Basics, by the authors of the Silver Palate cookbooks)

BAKED WINTER SQUASH SOUP

1. Preheat the oven to 350.

2. Cut 2 butternut squash and 2 acorn squash in half lengthwise (note: you can use about 4 pounds of any winter squash) and scoop out the seeds. Place the squash, skin side down, in a shallow roasting pan and place 1 Tbsp butter and 1 tsp brown sugar in each squash half. Arrange three large carrots, peeled and halved, and one thinly sliced onion around the squash. Place 2 cups of stock (chicken or vegetable) in the pan, cover tightly with aluminum foil, and bake for 2 hours.

3. Remove the pan from the oven and allow the vegetables to cool slightly. Scoop out the squash pulp from the skins and place in a soup pot. Add the carrots, onions, and cooking liquid.

4. Add 8 more cups of stock and 3/4 tsp nutmeg, 3/4 tsp ginger, a pinch of cayenne pepper, and salt to taste. (Note: I have also made this with a Tbsp of curry powder, and I sometimes add turmeric as well.) Stir well and bring to a boil, then simmer, uncovered, for 10 minutes. Puree the soup until smooth. Serve each portion with a dollop of yogurt and a sprinkle of chives.

 

 

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 22

In This Week's BEET:

  1. End of season Survey- on site today
  2. This Week's Share
  3. Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  4. Permaculture Podcast
  5. Happenings Around Town 
  6. Food Science:  Eggless Mayo & Scrambled eggs have arrived!

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


This Week's Share

  • garlic
  • herbs (Rosemary, thyme, oregano, sage)
  • greens (lettuce, kales, tatsoi, mizuna)
  • leeks
  • potatoes
  • carrots
  • winter squashes
  • sweet potatoes
  • broccoli
  • Fruit Share: Apples: final pick up tonight

Letter From Windflower Farm

Last week we had temperatures down to 18 degrees. Everything not covered was lost, with the possible exception of broccoli. But we covered just enough of everything else so as to fill out your shares for the next two weeks and four more for the winter share (you’ll find a sign up link below).  

This week’s Instagram image shows the team planting garlic. Although we had a good garlic crop this year, we will be sending just a small garlic bulb this week and another medium-sized one next week. We would like to have sent more but, because we had a bad garlic season the year before, we have had to keep our better, bigger bulbs for replanting. We have planted eight 330’ three-row beds this year (one of which was planted upside down by a new member of the staff, but has since been dug up and replanted pointy side up!), and hope to be able to include quite a bit of garlic in next year’s shares.  

Nate has been building a pair of wooden doors for a workshop we’ve been renovating under a shed roof off the north side of the barn. He is taking a gap year before finishing college and is expanding his knowledge of carpentry, welding, electronics (and sailing!). He and I have talked about a number of winter projects we’d like to undertake, including machinery repairs and crop harvest aids, but we both know nothing will happen if we don’t have a warm place in which to work. One of the barn’s posts had moved causing the roof line to follow something like a sine curve, so last week we jacked it up, removed a slice of the post, and set it down again, giving us a roof line approaching level. Jan has been helping to insulate the space, and once we’ve installed Nate’s doors and a little wood stove I bought a few years ago, the workshop should be pretty snug. After next week’s harvest, our last until the winter share, we’ll start in on actually building an electric cultivator we’ve been imagining for years.

It’s time to sign up for your winter share! Help keep your farmer and his staff off the streets of Valley Falls this winter by giving them something better to do with their time.Click here to sign up. https://windflowerfarm.wufoo.com/forms/windflower-farms-20152016-winter-share/. Or read on for more information.

This year we are celebrating our tenth winter share season! The share is meant to be something of an antidote to the long winter, and includes fresh salad greens from our greenhouses, stored roots, bulbs and tubers from our root cellars, and locally grown fruits in the form of cider, berry jams and stored apples. Shares are delivered just once a month so as not to overwhelm your kitchen.  

Our winter deliveries will take place on four Saturdays - November 21st, December 19th, January 9th and February 6th – and are timed to coincide with the deliveries made to your CSA pickup site by Lewis-Waite Farm and Winter Sun Farm. PLEASE sign up for your winter share by November 5th, the end of our regular season.

Have a great week, Ted


The Permaculture Podcast

Recently, the farm I work with in Costa Rica, was featured on The Permaculture Podcast.  Permaculture is a way of farming with the land in a regenerative way; it's a philosophy of working with nature and looking at systems as a whole, rather than individual components.  It's also about mindfulness:  setting an intention of gaining better relationships for both humans and the eco-systems in which we live.  I invite you all to give a listen to the podcast- it's an interesting conversation that covers everything from farming challenges in Costa Rica, to taking a closer look at your life style foot print, and even the joys of being part of a CSA.

Click Here to Listen!

Permaculture @ VerdEnergia, photo courtesy of Justin Orman

Permaculture @ VerdEnergia, photo courtesy of Justin Orman


The Great Jack O'Lantern Blaze in Croton-on-Hudson

The Great Jack O'Lantern Blaze in Croton-on-Hudson

Happenings Around Town

There's a lot happening this weekend as it's Halloween.  In Croton-on-Hudson you can catch the Great Jack O'Lantern Blaze, which features over 7000 hand carved pumpkins: there's a Pumpkin Planetarium, flying pumpkin ghosts, and the headless horseman.  

Nearby, in Sleepy Hollow, is one of the BEST Haunted House's around.  Horseman's Hollow.  Wander through a haunted school house ending in the lair of the Horseman.... click here for info and tickets!

Back in Brooklyn, NY finally get's its own FOOD MUSEUM!  MOFAD (Museum of Food and Drink).  It's not just for foodies, the founders boast-  How food is made, why it matters, history, science, and a had look at contemporary food issues.


The World's First Plant based Scrambled Eggs have arrived!

A San Francisco Tech has discovered in various plants, a way to make egg products, like mayonnaise, and now "scrambled eggs" without the eggs!  This is amazing news for all the chickens out there, living in tiny cages who need our compassion.  And for all the people who like mayo, but not the cholesterol.  Check out this awesome video!  I personally saw some "Just Mayo"  at the Associated Grocery store on Waverly :)


THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 21

In This Week's Beet:

  1. End of Season Survey- on site today & next week
  2. Winter Share sign up link
  3. 2016 Summer Season, sign up coming soon
  4. End of Season Happy Hour- November 5th
  5. This week's share
  6. Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  7. Queens County Farm Museum

 

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


Hello Everyone,

A few things I'd like to draw your attention to:

This week and next week we will have our end of season survey on site, and we would really appreciate it if you would take the time to fill it out.  Your comments and suggestions help us improve the CSA each year, and make changes as they are needed.

Next week is Halloween week!  Please encourage your youngsters to come and show off their costumes- any excuse to dress up is always fun!  There will be a few Halloween activities and snacks on site.

WINTER SHARE SIGN UP: Here is the link to the winter share sign up.  The Winter share is only 4 pick ups, over the next 3 months: it's a great deal, less of a commitment, and a great way to keep receiving fresh grown food throughout the winter.  Please sign up by NOVEMBER 5th.

2016 SUMMER SHARE:  Lastly, those members who are up to date on their volunteer hours, will soon have the opportunity to sign up for our 2016 CSA summer share (June-November).  You will need to give a small deposit to hold your space. 

END OF THE SEASON HAPPY HOUR AT FULTON-GRAND:  We would like to invite everyone to have a drink together at Fulton-Grand on November 5th.  It's nice to get to know your neighbors, especially when you know you have something in common :)  Fulton Grand Bar, (in case you haven't been) is on the corner of Fulton Ave & Grand.  They have happy hour from 2pm-8pm: $2 off all drinks, and make a mean dark and stormy.


This Week's Share:

  • yellow potatoes
  • carrots
  • onions
  • daikon radish
  • sweet peppers
  • lettuce
  • curly 'Winterbor" kale
  • tatsoi (chineese spinach)
  • fresh herbs
  • surprise veggie!

Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm

Down at the Borden’s farm stand today a leaf-peeper was overheard to say, “it’s drive-off-the-road pretty around here.” His car didn’t look any the worse for the wear, and all present were in agreement. “The colors are magnificent,” said one of us. “The prettiest in years,” said another. “The farming season is punctuated with the exclamation that is our fall splendor,” said a third, which, after a moment, we all agreed sounded rather poetic. And, unable to top that, our conversation turned to the fall apple crop, which happens to be one of the best in years, according to Tim Borden. This week’s fruit share will include Tim's ‘Empire’ apples and a half gallon of the Borden’s very fine cider. 

An unusually hard freeze expected tonight has us scampering about with the row covers that will give some protection to the few salad greens and carrot tops that remain in the field. From our high fields the view is indeed lovely. 

It’s time to sign up for your winter share. 

Click here to sign up. https://windflowerfarm.wufoo.com/forms/windflower-farms-20152016-winter-share/. Or read on for more information.

This year we are celebrating our tenth winter share season! The share is meant to be something of an antidote to the long winter, and includes fresh salad greens from our greenhouses, stored roots, bulbs and tubers from our root cellars, and locally grown fruits in the form of cider, berry jams and stored apples.  

Your four monthly deliveries will include approximately 2 lb. of our organically grown greens (including spinach, kale, tatsoi and Swiss chard) about 10 lb. of our storage vegetables (including carrots, red and yellow onions, a variety of potatoes, beets, leeks, sweet potatoes, rutabagas and more), along with 4-6 lb. of fruits, and either the Borden’s apple cider or our homemade jam from our own or locally grown fruit - all packed to fit in a returnable one-bushel box. An optional egg share from neighbors raising free-range hens is also available. They are fresh brown eggs from free-range hens raised by the Brownell and Davis families, and they are raised on grass and hay and given no feed that contains GMOs, antibiotics or hormones.

Our winter deliveries will take place on four Saturdays - November 21st, December 19th, January 9th and February 6th – and are timed to coincide with the deliveries made to your CSA pickup site by Lewis-Waite Farm and Winter Sun Farm.

PLEASE sign up for your winter share by November 5th, the end of our regular season.

Have a great week, Ted 


Fall Activities at the Queens County Farm:

Not too far away is the Queens County Farm & Museum.  It's a working farm in NYC, and they also have a lot of fun, family activities every weekend: Pumpkin Patches, A Corn Maze, Haunted Houses, Costume Parades, Train Rides, and many classes and workshops.  

Here's a link to their event's page


THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 20

In This Week's BEET:

  1. Winter Share Information
  2. Halloween Pick-Up
  3. Fall Related going's on around town

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


Hello Everyone,

Our last distribution is only a few weeks a way- November 5th.  Please stay tuned for our CSA survey; your opinions and suggestions are important to us, and help us make the CSA better.  Coming shortly we will have the information on next year's season, and below is the sign up for the winter share.


Windflower Farm's 2015-2016 Winter Share

Want to keep getting delicious organic veggies from Ted this winter?  You can!  Windflower Farm offers a less frequent winter share.  It is 4 pick-ups (once a month).  Each share includes 2 lbs of organic greens, 8-10 lbs of storage/root vegetables, such as carrots and potatoes, and 4-6 lbs of fruit or home made preserves.  An egg share is also available.

The pick up site is 35 Irving Place (2:30-4pm)

Total Cost - $178 (or $44.50 per pick up)

Pick up Dates (Saturdays):

  • November 21
  • December 19
  • January 9
  • February 6

Please sign up here by NOVEMBER 5TH.


Halloween Week at CHCSA

Our 2nd to last pick up falls on October 29th- just 2 days before Halloween!  We would like to encourage your youngsters to come to the pick up and show off their costumes!  There will be a few activities and treats to share to help get everyone in the Halloween Spirit.


Fall Events Around Town

The New York Botanical Garden is has a few Fall events coming up that you should check out: 

Pumpking Carving - October 24 & 25 from 10AM - 6pm

and, as part of the Frida Khalo exhibit (which, if you haven't seen, you should go before it closes at the end of this month!) DIA DE LOS MUERTOS Parade and Festivities the last 2 weekends in October.

For more info on both events click here.

Apple Picking

Want to go?  it's fun, whether it's you, you & friends, or you & family & everyone you know.  Time Out put together a great list of places near NYC.  Click here.  I went a few weekends ago, and in addition to picking enough apples to fill a small children's pool, I also played apple baseball.  Hitting the home run is supremely satisfying. 

A Farm just outside the city:  Stone Barns

Dan Barber is one of my favorite chefs- because he is both a chef and a farmer- he was one of the first chefs to open a high end restaurant in NYC that had a changing daily menu based on what his farm, Stone Barns, was producing.  His farm is not far from the city, (easily accessible by Metro North) and it's a real treat to see in action.  They also have a delicious casual cafe for everyone, and of course- for something special- the restaurant at Stone Barns.

Check out the farm events here.

And if you don't know Dan Barber- check him out on one of my favorite Ted Talks.  

DAN BARBER: How I fell in Love with a fish

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 19

In This Week's BEET:

  1. CSA News
  2. Your Share
  3. Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  4. Recipes
  5. Storage Tips

Pick up today: 5:00-7:30 at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


Hello Everyone,

Fall is upon us!  And winter squashes are on their way, along with our Halloween Pot Luck, and our last distribution, which is November 5th.  If you still need to fulfill your volunteer hours, please sign up, or if none of the slots left work for your schedule, please contact me- we need volunteers to help out with the Halloween Pot Luck, and are looking for a few tech savvy people to do a few other projects.

Please keep bringing your extra bags, and if you didn't bring your wallet last distort- bring it tonight, as there will once again be Cacao for Sale on site!  


This Week's Share:

  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet peppers
  • Winter Squashes (acorns & buttercups)
  • Leeks
  • Russet Potatoes
  • Fresh herbs
  • Spinach
  • Kale
  • Bok Choy
  • Broccoli
  • Carrots
  • Fruit Share: Bosc pears & Honey Crisp Apples

News from Windflower Farm

Our fall root crop harvest has been in full swing here at Windflower Farm for the last two weeks and more.  Carrots, rutabagas, beets, potatoes, turnips and sweet potatoes are filling up our empty places. Earlier this week we refined our sweet potato harvesting technique with a mechanical harvesting aid (see our Instagram page for an image), and today we had harvesting help – visiting CSA shareholders and new friends. We have harvested three quarters or so of the crop, and have just nine beds to go, or perhaps another 200 bushels. Although your first sweet potatoes will arrive this week, you might consider letting them sit on a warm counter for another week to let more of the starches turn to sugars and more of the flavor to develop. Sweet potatoes require curing, and we do most of that here at the farm. We place the harvested crops in a warm greenhouse (85 F) for at least a week prior to sending them to you. That allows the skin to set, wounds to heal, and helps the roots last in storage. And curing begins the conversion of starches to sugars. It’s a relatively new crop for us, and we are tickled to have had such a good one. I hope you enjoy them. Our favorite lasagna recipe features sweet potatoes, as does our favorite omelet, which is all the better when combined with cardamon.      

Have a great Week,

Ted & Jan


Recipes

I love winter squashes!  Almost as much as I love Heirloom Tomatoes.... I will defiantly be making a butternut squash galette; the dough is very quick to come together, and squashes flavor only improves in the oven.  

This squash amazing soup recipe from Bed-Stuy's Bryant Terry gives another spin on squash soup- it's story and delicate- using leeks and pears instead of onions and apples, and is extra creamy with the addition of coconut milk.  I like to add a dash of Herbs de Provence :)  

If you're not going to eat all your fruit right away, might I suggest making some preserves and canning it?  Jams and Apple Butter are great Holiday gifts.  Especially if they're home made.  Just a little something to warm someone's heart.  Here's a recipe for Ginger Pear Jam and Slow Cooker Apple butter that I make every year, and by the following year- (usually sooner) there is never any left.  If you've never canned before, Jams and Apple butter are a great way to start- because of the sugar and citrus, they are naturally resistant to spoilage, and only take about 12 minutes in the hot water bath to seal.  For Canning instructions- go here.

I made this Gluten Free Apple Cheddar Loaf last weekend for the family, and not one bite was left after dinner- the glutens and the non-glutens all agreed on it's deliciousness.  Highly recommended. 



Storage Tips

Keep in a cool dry spot -somewhere around 50-55 degrees if possible, higher temps cause the flesh to become stringy.  Clean the squashes with white vinegar or grapefruit oil, make sure they are fully dry before storing.  A cooler spot in your apartment- near the front door- where it's drafty, or a basement if you happen to have one.  Wrap squash loosely in paper and place in cardboard box when putting it away for a while.

Acorn squash keep for up to 4 weeks 

Buttercup keeps up to 13 weeks

Butternut keeps up to 6 months (so eat them last!)

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 18

In This Week's BEET:

  • Your Share
  • Letter from Ted
  • Cacao Tonight!

Pick up today: 5:00-7:30 at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


Your Share This Week:

  • Tomatoes
  • Peppers
  • Chilies
  • Onions
  • Cilantro or Basil
  • Potatoes
  • Eggplants
  • Radishes
  • Lettuces
  • Kale
  • Arugula
  • Spinach

Letter From Ted & Windflower Farm

The moon – a harvest moon - is full and bright tonight, and the sky is clear. A chill is in the air and our first frost may occur later this week, according to forecasts. It’s time for us to harvest anything that is not cold hardy. We are now in the middle of our harvest of the vegetables that will make up your final six shares.The time has flown by.

Harvesting potatoes and sweet potatoes by hand is a pretty straightforward proposition. Grab a garden fork, place it just outside the potato row, stomp down - if you have rocks you might stomp down two or three times – and then, with a simple prying motion, turn the soil over. Potatoes will come spilling out. Keep moving down the row in that way and soon you’ll have a crateful of spuds. And if all you need to harvest is a crate or two you don’t really need to think any more about it. If, however, you have 30 crates to harvest just for Tuesday’s delivery (and 30 more for Thursday), you’ll want to think about mechanical harvesting.   

We found a sturdy one-row harvester several years ago and keep it in good running order with copious amounts of gear oil and chain lubricant and the occasional weld. It does nothing more than lift the tubers out of the soil and then redeposit them on top of the ground, from which we pick them up by hand and place them into crates. It’s leaps and bounds better than the garden fork. Mechanical harvesting of sweet potatoes is a little less straightforward. They are tender-skinned and bruised by the mechanical action of the potato harvester. Nevertheless, because we have too many to harvest by hand, we have been experimenting with sweet potato harvest aids of various kinds this week. We haven’t found the ideal tool, but we’re making headway. And, more importantly, we are happy with the quality of this year’s crop. And we think you will be, too. Our first 70 bushels have been curing in a greenhouse and will be in your shares next week.

Other fall crops are also on the way soon, including leeks and turnips, which are cold hardy and remain in the field, and butternut and Delicata squashes, which are tender and were harvested a couple of weeks ago.


Don't forget: Cacao on site Tonight & next week!

Fresh Cacao direct from a partner farm in Costa Rica will be for sale on site during distribution.

The time for hot chocolate has come!  Treat yourself and your friends :) 

Cash only: $12 per 1/2 pound

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 17

In This Week's BEET:

  1. Please Bring Bags
  2. New at Lewis Waite
  3. Fire Cider- trademark laws against common products
  4. Volunteer Slots are filling up/Halloween Potluck
  5. Cacao for the next 2 weeks

Pick up today: 5:00-7:30 at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE AND YELLOW SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


Call For Bags!

Once again, our bag supply is running low- extra bags around the office or the home?  Bring them in!  Bags of all materials are welcome.


There are a bunch of new products available from the collective farms at Lewis Waite.  If you haven't ordered from them recently, it's time to check back in.  With a little pre-planning, you can save yourself a trip to the grocery store, and fill up your cabinets while supporting local farms! 

  • Argyllshire Lamb has many of their cuts on special this week.
  • Cowbella dairy will soon be offering kiefer.
  • Hawthorne Valley farm is offering lacto-fermented hot sauce!  Yum!  Lacto-fermentation is the traditional way (as in sauerkraut) using only water and salt to ferment.
  • Pasture raised ducks from Laughing Stock Farm are ready, after fattening up all summer.
  • Thanksgiving turkey will be available soon for pre-ordering.  Splurge, and get your family a free-range, humanely raised organic turkey to give thanks this year.
  • Taking roots Apothecary will be offering fire cider and other herbs to help with cold/flu season.

Side Note regarding fire cider: 

Fire cider is a common name for an herbal vinegar tonic that helps one fight the cold/flu and general sickness during the colder months.  It is a general recipe that has been passed along from people for the past 30 years.  Recently, an herbalist friend of mine told me that there is a legal battle going on- because one company, Shire City Herbals, has decided to trademark both the name- "Fire Cider" and the common recipe.  Personally, I don't think it's appropriate that one company should own the rights to a common product, and it's name, the implications of this law seem quite ominous for other common goods- to learn more about the legal battle of small time herbalists vs. trademarking laws click here.  OR to make your own fire cider; click here!

Courtesy of Mountain Rose blog

Courtesy of Mountain Rose blog



Call For Volunteers: Help Us Throw The Halloween Potluck! 

Seeking parents, gals, ghouls, and anyone interested in helping us to decorate and entertain our littlest CSA members on Thursday October 29th. The Halloween Potluck is a special event for the CHCSA membership, and volunteers are needed for the early shift to help put up decorations, set up food, and run face paint and small games for kids. Costumes welcome, but not required! Please contact roxanne.earley@gmail.comfor more information


Don't forget: Cacao on site the next 2 weeks!

Fresh Cacao direct from a partner farm in Costa Rica will be for sale on site during distribution.  

Cash only: $12 per 1/2 pound

The Beet: Volume 14, Issue 16

In This Week's BEET:

  1. This week's share
  2. Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  3. Cacao update!
  4. Open House Essay from Ruth, our CHCSA Coordinator
  5. Pics from Farm Weekend

Pick up today: 5:00-7:30 at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP


This Week's Share:

  • Tomatoes
  • Cilantro
  • Chilies
  • Onions
  • Bell peppers and corn
  • Radishes
  • Lettuces
  • Arugula
  • Assorted Greens
  • Fruit: Peaches

Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm

The heat of mid-summer is beginning to give way. A front this weekend has delivered some much needed rain - we hadn’t had any since early August - and in its wake a refreshing cool-down. Cucumbers and squashes have already come to a near standstill, and the next few weeks will bring the last of our tomatoes, corn and beans. But don’t fret, other good vegetables are on their way! Warm season crops are always too short-lived, but they will be replaced with the hardy, nutritious and delicious crops of fall: sweet potatoes, winter squashes, leeks, carrots, garlic, beets, onions, turnips, broccoli, cabbages, Irish potatoes, fennel, rutabagas, and a range of cold-hardy greens. I can see soups and stews and piles of roasted, mashed and stir fried vegetables.

I’m sorry for not having written these past two weeks. We took a little “slow down” the week after our open house just to catch our breath, and then we became busy with late summer activities. Farm seasons have distinct cycles, and some of the more interesting ones begin in late summer. We are now turning our attention to this winter’s greens, next June’s strawberries, July’s onions, and September’s garlic.

Last week we planted strawberries. We took bare root cuttings and potted them into flats about a month ago. Four weeks later – which was last week - they had root systems sufficient for planting in the field. This week we’ll mulch them and, because their leaves are a favorite food of deer, surround them with a protective electric fence. In mid-October we’ll pinch any runners they produce and cover them with two layers of floating row cover. If all goes well they’ll be ready for harvest next June. I’ll post pictures on our Instagram account.

Last weekend we attended the Southern Vermont Garlic Festival where we picked up some new German White planting stock. We are still on the hunt for Spanish Roja to fill out our planting for next year. In the meantime, we’ve been curing our own crop, which is largely a German White variety that we harvested in early August, and plan to get it sorted this week. We will hold some 1500 bulbs back for replanting, and put the rest, which may amount to just two distributions, in your shares beginning in a couple of weeks. Then the annual cycle will begin anew. We will plant next year’s garlic in a month from now, in mid-October, dig it next August, cure it through September, and ship it off soon afterwards. We’ve already worked up the ground and shaped the beds. We need only lay the mulch and drip irrigation lines to be ready for planting.  And a month after planting, just as with strawberries, we’ll cover the garlic beds with floating row cover. And at about the time we cover our garlic we will plant about a quarter acre of onion sets, which we will be a part of next July’s CSA shares.

We began one other project last week: the seeding of our winter greens crop. We sowed spinach, kales, chard, tatsoi, choy and arugula in preparation for transplanting into greenhouses on Columbus Day Weekend, in early October, after we’ve torn out this year’s old tomato plants. We expect to harvest the greens from November through February, as part of our winter share. Look for a winter share signup link in early October newsletters.

Have a great week, Ted  


Cacao Update

The Cacao has finally made it's journey from Costa Rica to the East Coast, and will be ready for purchase in 2 weeks during the CHCSA distribution!

Avalible on October 1st & 8th

1/2 lb. bags will be offered for 12$ 

Cash only please.


Windflower Farm Weekend Reflections

from Ruth Katcher, our CSA Coordinator

Four hours north of the city, sitting on 90 acres of land, Windflower Farm seems like everything Brooklyn is not: long rows of vegetables and flowers stretching over rolling fields, quiet save for the sound of crickets. This weekend, the outskirts of those fields were dotted with tents, as members of some of the thirteen CSAs served by Windflower Farm came to enjoy the annual open house. 

According to farmer Ted Blomgren, it helps that the flower share, which his wife Jan directs, winds down in the weeks before the open house. It’s a lot of work but worth it, he adds. From the beautifully decorated picnic tables to the fields ripe with harvest to the brand-new outhouse, everything about Windflower Farm was on display. 

The Clinton Hill CSA has a special place for Ted, because he’s worked with us longer than any of his other current CSAs. It was 16 years ago that he took over a CSA from another farmer. The Clinton Hill CSA joined him two years later. 

Planting, weeding, and washing determine a farm’s ability to stay in business, says Ted. Starting his tour in the planting shed, he shows us trays of baby lettuce and chard soon to be transplanted into the fields. A new transplanter—bought on EBay!--makes the job easier, saving time and the workers’ backs. Tomato plants are everywhere, and we pass trays of already harvested garlic and onions. Ted shows us potatoes, carrots, turnips, all nearly grown, as well as squash that’s curing on the vine. Asking for a show of hands on who likes eggplant, he seems surprised that nearly half of the CSA members on the tour responded—perhaps we’ll see more eggplant in next season’s share! 

As an experienced farmer, Ted knows, without seeing the evidence, when a field is ready for weeding. Pointing to one tractor and then another, he shows us that one works between the rows, the other to weed within the row. Asked if he has his weeding schedules on a spreadsheet he says no. It’s all in his head—the information that will allow him to provide 22 weeks of vegetables for a total of 1100 shares. 

After a delicious potluck supper, many visitors to the farm settle down at the bonfire, while others sit at picnic tables and sample warm maple syrup and cotton candy made from maple sugar, both contributed by the Davis family, who also provide our egg share. The moon shows the way to the tents, pitched on soft grass at the edge of a field. The next morning, the Ted’s family provides breakfast, while children weave through the crowd waving duck and chicken eggs they’ve harvested from Ted’s small poultry flock. 

Asked what he’s going to do when everyone leaves, Ted says, “A nap.” In fact, he leads a small group to the Davis farm, where the Davis farmers, father and son, show off a flock of hens, too busy rooting for food to notice strangers in their yard. It’s an enjoyable ending to a weekend of revelations, chief among them the extraordinary amount of work and care that go into our weekly deliveries of fresh produce. 

Ted & guests in one of the green houses

Ted & guests in one of the green houses

Potatoes right out of the earth

Potatoes right out of the earth

The new out house

The new out house

Camping in one of the fields left for fallow

Camping in one of the fields left for fallow

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 15

In This Week's BEET:

  1. The Share
  2. Recipes
  3. Storage Tips

Pick Up Today: 5:00 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP


This Week's Share

  • 2 kinds of lettuce
  • Arugula
  • Tokyo bekana
  • Chilies
  • Tomatoes
  • Little red onions
  • Sweet peppers
  • Corn
  • Carrots

Recipes:

What is Tokyo beckana?  It is a popular Chinese green similar to Bok Choy, and can be eaten raw or cooked.   The taste is similar to spinach, and both the leaf and the stem can be eaten.  It's great sautéed, braised, or simmered in a soup.  

Try it in a stir fry like this one, or in a delicious curry with kobacha squash here, OR try this delicious looking asian green salad that is sure to please even those skeptical of greens.

Since we are getting a lot of greens this week I thought I would include some late summer/ early fall salad recipes- which are great for these nights, where the last thing you want to do is turn the oven or stove on.

This Warm Escarole with Mushrooms Salad is quite simple- and you could easily sub the Escarole for Tokyo beckon.

Arugula + Figs + vinaigrette = delicious side salad.  Get the recipe here, and goto Sahadi's, or the Farmers Market at Grand Army Plaza for some fresh figs!

Six Ingredients Corn Salad

Try pairing one of the salads from above with this simple carrot soup for a light week night dinner.  The best thing about making soup, is that it only gets better the next day!


Storage Tips & Health Benefits for Carrots:

Cut the tops off, and place in a closed container with plenty of moisture: either wrap them in a damp towel, or you can dunk them in a bowl of water every couple of days if you are storing for a long time.

Carrots are rich in antioxidants, specifically beta-carotene (which gives them their bright orange color), and have high levels of Vitamin A & C.  In addition, carrots contain fiber, vitamin K, potassium, folate, manganese, phosphorus, vitamin E & zinc.

Eating carrots raw or lightly steamed gives you the most nutritional benefit.

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 12

Happy Labor Day Weekend!

Pick Up Today: 5:00 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


from our CHCSA Core Coordinator, Ruth Katcher

from our CHCSA Core Coordinator, Ruth Katcher

Ted's Annual Open House

For those of you who made it up this weekend, we hope you enjoyed yourselves!  We would love to hear from you- your highlights and if you have any pictures you would like to share:  please send them to me, and I'll put them in next week's BEET, or feel free to post them on our Facebook page, or share on your Instagram #CLINTONHILLCSA


The sun is setting just a little bit sooner, and the night time temperature is feeling nice and cool; summer will be turning into fall soon.  For us at the CSA that means the end of tomato season, and the beginning of delicata squashes and pumpkins.  Here's a few recipes to help you enjoy the last of your summer tomatoes:

Enjoy the last of your heirloom tomatoes with this amazing salad!  Roasting half of the tomatoes gives another deep layer of flavor and texture.

Here is a recipe for a tomato & peach salad that is easy to prepare, looks fantastic on the table, and will satisfy all your different tastebuds.  

Where to get the Best Mozzarella & Burrata:  Recently I went to Lioni's in search of smoked mozzarella, as good as the kind they have at the Arthur Avenue Market, and I was not disappointed.  If you are looking for a piece of old school Italian Brooklyn, they won't disappoint.  They make incredible sandwiches in addition to making all their own mozzarella and baked goods.


Fall products are coming in at Lewis Waite Farm Collective.  If you haven't ordered from them in a while, now might be a good time to re-visit them to place your order fro next week.


CSA HAPPY HOUR!

WHEN:  SEPTEMBER 9TH 5-8pm

WHERE:  FLATBUSH FARMS

Come meet other fellow Brooklyn CSA members!  Happy Hour Specials until 7pm!  1$ from all drinks purchased will goto support Just Food and the CSA movement in NYC.  Tho not required, if you know you'd like to come, please RSVP here.


Carnival / West Indian Day Parade this weekend!

Carnival is the biggest festival in South America, with Colombia and Brazil hosting the largest parades, but Brooklyn is proud to host the 3rd largest Carnival in the world!  If you are not going out of town this weekend- check it out!  It's amazing, and there will be great street eats as well!

MONDAY, September 7th.  Get info about it here!

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 11

In This Week's Beet:

  1. This Week's Share
  2. Letter from Ted
  3. Farm Weekend: This Saturday & Sunday
  4. CSA Happy Hour: Flatbush Farm Prospect Heights

Pick Up Today: 5:00 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT


This Week's Share:

  • Tomatos

  • Sweet Corn

  • Lettuce

  • Cucumbers

  • Summer Squashes

  • Braising Mix

  • Yellow Onion

  • Sweet Peppers

  • Parsley

  • Snap Beans

  • Peaches (Fruit Share)


News From Windflower Farm

This marks the halfway point in our delivery season. After this week’s share there will be just ten more to go. The first half of those should consist of summer vegetables like those you’ve been getting these last few weeks, and the final four or five shares will be comprised of a greater proportion of greens and root crops. 

In preparation for the upcoming open house on the farm, Jan and Nate and I have been making an outhouse. We have two now, and they are really very pleasant (really, it’s all about the wood shavings and the lime and the fresh breeze), but because it appears that turnout will be good, we thought we’d do something to shorten the lines on Sunday morning. Jan wanted to rent a portable outhouse, but I wouldn’t stand for it: the smell, the weird blue water, the plastic walls. It would spoil a nice time in the country. We started this morning and, so far, we’ve erected the walls and installed the door. Tomorrow we’ll add the roof, build the seat, add lights and set it in place. The farm where I got my start had a two-seater outhouse, which I am told was once relatively common, but this one is just single seater.    

In addition to finishing open house preparations, our to-do list this week includes seeding a round of fall greens, including spinach, arugula, kale, and some salad mixes, harvesting the last of our onions, harvesting a block of cabbage, one of beets, and another of potatoes, transplanting lettuce, tatsoi, Swiss chard, and bok choy, mowing under some old, weedy beds, and chisel plowing in preparation for sowing some cover crops.

Have a great week, Ted


Open House Weekend at Windflower Farm!

We hope those of you that are going are as excited as we are!  The weather this weekend is going to be perfect.  Cool mornings, sunny & warm afternoons with the full moon coming on Saturday night!  Perfect for bonfires and a camping.

If you are planning on going this weekend- please reply to the newsletter email to let me know- Ted has asked us for a rough head count.

See you there!  


CSA Happy Hour & Trivia Night - September 9th

Just Food is hosting a happy hour and trivia night! 

When:  Wednesday September 9th at Flatbush Farm, from 5pm to 7pm.

Have fun and get to know the people in your CSA community- people from our CSA, Prospect Heights, Park Slope and Bed-Stuy are all invited.  Admission is free!  There will be drink specials, and $1 from each drink will goto support JUST FOOD.

Click HERE to RSVP- which is suggested, but not required.  

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 10

 

In This Week's Beet:

  1. Farm Weekend!
  2. Reminders:  All Payments Due, We Need More Plastic Bags & Sign up to Volunteer
  3. Raw Cacao Beans are coming to our CSA!
  4. Recipes 

Pick Up Today: 5:00 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE AND GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP


FARM WEEKEND!

August 29th and 30th

Come get to know our farm!  Windflower farm will be having it's annual open house weekend the last weekend in August, Saturday afternoon until Sunday morning.  On Saturday Ted gives tours of the farm, and you are welcome to visit the neighboring farms- as well as a local winery/brewery.  Saturday night is a big pot luck dinner- where Jan and Ted go all out and everyone who comes is encouraged to bring a dish to share.  There are a few local vendors that come selling farm goods like Honey, cheeses, mead, wine, local beer, and baked goods.  That night everyone who comes is welcome to camp (please bring your own tent and gear) on his beautiful property.  There is a bonfire, and if you play an instrument- you are encouraged to bring it!  Kids and Pets welcome!  Sunday morning is farm brunch, cooked by Ted and Jan.  Ted's farm is beautiful, and I would highly recommend participating this weekend.  Ted and Jan are gracious hosts, and let's face it- getting out of the city in the heat of August- for the cool upstate air is always a welcome treat.

Ted supplies vegetables to 5 other NYC CSA's, so you will get to meet people from other neighborhoods who share your passion for healthy food.  If you are looking to carpool- please post about it on our CSA forum.  Each year members are able to coordinate with one another to get up there.  The drive to Windflower farm is about 3 and a half to 4 hours depending on traffic.


ALL PAYMENTS ARE NOW DUE

If you still owe a payment, please mail in a check immediately.  If you have questions, or need a payment plan - please write to treasurer@clintonhillcsa.org


CALL FOR BAGS

Once again we are running low- if you have any extra plastic bags- you know what to do with them!


SIGN UP TO VOLUNTEER!

The success of our CSA depends absolutely on the participation of our members. If you are able to volunteer tomorrow night, please email our volunteer coordinator, Grace, right away to say so, and sign up online via Volunteer Spot. 

All Full Share households are required to give 4 hours of their time each season. All Half Share households are required to give 2 hours of their time each season! 

If you have not signed up for your volunteer hours for this season, please sign up right away to do so on Volunteer Spot. If your household does not complete your required 4 hours of volunteering, you will not be eligible for early registration next season. Our wait list is over 150 families, and you will likely not get a spot next year. So please, honor your commitment to our CSA and find the time to fulfill those volunteer hours. We can't do it without you!

SIGN UP HERE TODAY!

And to those of you who have already volunteered: You rock! Thanks so much! 


RAW CACAO SHARE FOR SALE SOON!

CHCSA  is pleased to announce that early in September it will be offering some "Local" grown cacao beans for sale on site during pick up.  One of our core members is part of a permaculture farm collective in Costa Rica, and is going to be bringing some beans directly from the farm to our CSA!   These beans were picked and dried by hand, in organic soil in the south of Costa Rica.

People have been enjoying the benefits of this superfood for thousands of years; This delicious superfood has a long rich history with people in South and Central America.  It was used as a food, medicine and a currency!  

Raw Cacao beans are rich in antioxidants, and have many health benefits; such as lowering your risk of cancer and heart disease.  The beans may be eaten "raw" which is what they are called in their dried form, chopped up and added to baked goods as "nibs" or they can be ground up to make coco powder, and then chocolate.  :)

Half Pound bags will be for sale for $12

We hope you are looking forward to it!  Stay tuned for more information.


RECOMMENDED RECIPES

 

 

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 9

In This Week's Beet:

  1. Farm Weekend!
  2. Reminders:  All Payments Due & Sign up to Volunteer
  3. Raw Cacao Beans are coming to our CSA!

Pick Up Today: 5:00 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE AND YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP


FARM WEEKEND!

August 29th and 30th

Come get to know our farm!  Windflower farm will be having it's annual open house weekend the last weekend in August, Saturday afternoon until Sunday morning.  On Saturday Ted gives tours of the farm, and you are welcome to visit the neighboring farms- as well as a local winery/brewery.  Saturday night is a big pot luck dinner- where Jan and Ted go all out and everyone who comes is encouraged to bring a dish to share.  There are a few local vendors that come selling farm goods like Honey, cheeses, mead, wine, local beer, and baked goods.  That night everyone who comes is welcome to camp (please bring your own tent and gear) on his beautiful property.  There is a bonfire, and if you play an instrument- you are encouraged to bring it!  Kids and Pets welcome!  Sunday morning is farm brunch, cooked by Ted and Jan.  Ted's farm is beautiful, and I would highly recommend participating this weekend.  Ted and Jan are gracious hosts, and let's face it- getting out of the city in the heat of August- for the cool upstate air is always a welcome treat.

Ted supplies vegetables to 5 other NYC CSA's, so you will get to meet people from other neighborhoods who share your passion for healthy food.  If you are looking to carpool- please post about it on our CSA forum.  Each year members are able to coordinate with one another to get up there.  The drive to Windflower farm is about 3 and a half to 4 hours depending on traffic.


ALL PAYMENTS ARE NOW DUE

If you still owe a payment, please mail in a check immediately.  If you have questions, or need a payment plan - please write to treasurer@clintonhillcsa.org

CALL FOR BAGS

Once again we are running low- if you have any extra plastic bags- you know what to do with them!

SIGN UP TO VOLUNTEER!


RAW CACAO SHARE FOR SALE SOON!

CHCSA  is pleased to announce that early in September it will be offering some "Local" grown cacao beans for sale on site during pick up.  One of our core members is part of a permaculture farm collective in Costa Rica, and is going to be bringing some beans directly from the farm to our CSA!   These beans were picked and dried by hand, in organic soil in the south of Costa Rica.

People have been enjoying the benefits of this superfood for thousands of years; This delicious superfood has a long rich history with people in South and Central America.  It was used as a food, medicine and a currency!  

Raw Cacao beans are rich in antioxidants, and have many health benefits; such as lowering your risk of cancer and heart disease.  The beans may be eaten "raw" which is what they are called in their dried form, chopped up and added to baked goods as "nibs" or they can be ground up to make coco powder, and then chocolate.  :)

Half Pound bags will be for sale for $12

We hope you are looking forward to it!  


AROUND TOWN

Tickets to Brooklyn's TASTE festival are now on sale.  SUNDAY September 13th  1-5pm

TASTE Williamsburg Greenpoint is an annual outdoor celebration of North Brooklyn's local flavor! Entering it's 6th year, this block party style tasting event features samples from over 40 of the neighborhood's best restaurants, bars, breweries and wineries, along with music and much more!



THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 8

This Week's Beet:

  • Bring plastic bags!
  • Reminder: Sign up to volunteer
  • This week's share
  • Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  • Cucumbers- benefits and practical uses

Pick Up Today: 5:00 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE AND YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP


PLEASE BRING YOUR EXTRA BAGS TO SHARE!

We are running low on extra bags.  If you have extra at home or work (which I know you do) please bring them with you tonight to share with members who may need extra.  Thanks!

A GENTLE REMINDER:

We have been a little light on volunteers the past 2 weeks.  If you haven't done so yet- please sign up here.


THIS WEEK'S SHARE:

  • tomatoes
  • peppers or eggplants
  • red cabbage
  • snap beans or bunched baby beets
  • cucumbers
  • squash or zucchini
  • bianca onions
  • dinosaur or red russian kale
  • romain lettuce
  • fruit: plums or blueberries

News from Windflower Farm:

A friend (and fellow farmer) and I spent yesterday afternoon at the new Hudson Valley Farm Hub near Kingston. We went to see what the hub-bub (sorry) was about, to check out some of the fancy European equipment on exhibit, and to visit with the old friends we knew would be there. The farm hub is part of the Local Economies Project, which is project of the New World Foundation and established, ultimately, with funding from Warren Buffet’s fortune. It’s goal is to “foster a regional agriculture that is environmentally sound, economically vibrant and socially responsible.” Because, if you were to replace the words “regional agriculture” with “farm” that phrase could come straight from Windflower Farm’s own mission statement, along with that of virtually every organic farmer I know, I figured I ought to check in. You can check in, too, if you like, by going to www.hvfarmhub.org. How they will accomplish these aims is not clear, just as we have learned that, at the scale of our individual farm, they remain elusive. But one thing is apparent: local communities are central to the solution. 

When you become a CSA member – a “shareholder” in more traditional CSA parlance – you are agreeing not only to share in the risks of a risky business, you are also agreeing to participate in a way of growing food that strives to be environmentally better than the pesticide- and fertilizer-intensive farming of our predecessors. And you are agreeing to experiment in an economic model that is at some variance with convention – you pay in advance, you stick with us (or the small collection of growers we represent)  every week, thick or thin, for a long season, and you agree to support the larger mission of farmworker welfare, which begins with paying a fair wage and providing good, safe working conditions. None of these things would be happening in the Hudson Valley if it weren’t for loyal customers, like you, who know what they were paying for when they buy organic vegetables and believe in the importance of food grown with a greater purpose. I know it sounds corny, but it reminds me of the phrase everyone sings out at the end of a 12-step meeting: “it works if you work it, so keep coming back!”  The growth of the CSA movement (and the local foods movement) has increased the number of viable organic farms in the Valley, the number of acres under organic production, and the amount of organic food going to local households like no other farming movement before it.  

When I returned to the farm, I found son Nate’s head shaved, a deep, rough gash on the top of his head mended with four steel staples and my computer’s browser open to a page on “brain hemorrhage.”  It turns out that the post pounder Nate was using overhead when working on some fencing slipped and came crashing down on his skull. It was a bloody business. On top of it,  Jan and Jacob were grocery shopping, I was at the farm hub and, at first, Nate couldn’t find a phone with which to reach out for help. He eventually found one in the box truck, but none of us answered his call right away. Bleeding badly and thinking he might be in some trouble, he shaved the area around the wound to get a better look and then searched the internet for signs of serious head injury. By the time Jan arrived home, he had things well in hand, but they went off the clinic anyway for another opinion and four steel staples. In sixteen years here we have had just one other farm accident requiring more than a bandage, and that was when Salvador did exactly the same thing with a post pounder. It may be a crazy coincidence, but I think we’ll hire a professional the next time we install a deer fence.

Best,

Ted


CUCUMBERS!

Cucumbers are a secret vitamin powerhouse. They contain most of the vitamins you need every day; just one cucumber contains Vitamin B1, B2, B3, B5, B6, Folic Acid, Vitamin C, Calcium, Iron, Magnesium, Phosphorus, Potassium and Zinc.  And- did you know that all that Vitamin B can provide a quick pick-me-up in lieu of caffeine?  Eating a cucumber salad in the afternoon will renew your energy and focus, with out leaving you jittery.

Cucumbers are more than just food- here's a list of other uses that will amaze you:

  1. De-fogging your bathroom mirror: try rubbing a slice along the mirror after a shower: it will eliminate the fog, and leave your bathroom smelling sweet
  2. Eliminates garden grubs: put a few slices in a pie tin and place in you garden: the chemicals in the cucumber react with the aluminum to give off a scene which will drive away garden pests.
  3. Removing celulite lines before going to the beach: rub a few slices of cucumber along the lines for a few minutes: the phytochemical in the cucumber cause the collagen in your skin tighten; firming up the outer layer and reducing cellulite visibility.
  4. Hangover cure:  Eating a few slices before bed will help you wake up headache free!  Cucumbers contain enough sugar and B vitamins and electrolytes to replenish you overnight.
  5. Stressed out?  Cut up an entire cucumber and place it in boiling water: the chemicals and nutrients from the cucumber will react with the boiling water and release in the steam, creating a soothing, relaxing aroma that will help reduce stress.
  6. Eliminate bad breath: Pressing a cucumber slice to the roof of your mouth with your tongue for 30 seconds will kill the bacteria in your mouth which cause bad breath!

Here's another recipe: Cucumber Peanut Salad.  This salad only gets better the next day!

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 7

IN THIS WEEKS BEET:

  1. This week's share
  2. Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  3. A little history from the CHCSA
  4. Recipes
  5. Storage tips

Pick Up Today: 5:30 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP


Today share includes:

  • tomatoes
  • peppers or eggplants
  • bunched baby beets or hakurei turnips
  • cucumbers
  • squashes or zucchini
  • torpedo onions
  • broccoli or cabbage
  • collards, swiss chard, bok choy and purple mizuna
  • fruit: plums or blueberries

A Few Words From Ted:

Deer wiped out this and next week’s lettuce planting, but we should see it back in shares soon. A doe and her three speckled fawns were the culprits, and they have been scooted back outside the fence for the time being. They can ruin hundreds of heads in a single night and can be difficult and expensive to manage. Potatoes, snap beans and sweet corn are coming very soon.

Sunday. A thunderstorm sent us scampering from the fields this evening. And a tornado warning sent us out again to close up greenhouse sides and barn doors. The storm fell apart before crossing to our side of the Hudson, providing just enough rainfall to cool things down and irrigate the crops we transplanted last week. It was my hope that this rain would also be watering today’s new seeding, but the electronics in my seeder failed. The device’s electrical components, which had become wet, are now sitting in a bag of rice on the recommendation of my teenager, Jacob, who tells me the technique works to dry out cell phones. The piece of equipment I seed with, a Sutton Seed Spider, is an excellent tool. Nate, my oldest son, and I do all of our carrot, beet, radish and greens seeding with it. The brainy parts – motors and controllers – were made in New Zealand, and the brawny parts were made in Salinas, California, where it spent its early years on a salad farm. It’s faster and better by far than my old Planet Junior. But my old seeder had the advantage of having no electronics, and I could repair anything on it that would go wrong. All I can do now is hope the rice trick works. Or buy a new controller. It’s the complaint a fan of carbureted American muscle cars might have made of modern, computer controlled imports – the technology is superior, but the repairs are expensive.  

You are invited to our open house on the farm on the weekend of August 28-29. We’d love to have you join us for farm tours and demonstrations (see our Sutton Seed Spider and our electric tractors), a potluck supper, live music, a bonfire, camping on the farm, tours of local wineries and the town’s new brewery, swimming in the Battenkill River and a visit to the nearby Washington County Farm. A big farmer’s breakfast on Sunday is on us. Kid friendly, but not entirely kid focused. I hope you can join us.       

Have a great week, Ted


The CSA Banner: A Little History

It’s the first thing you see every week as you turn the corner off Gates onto Downing Street. Our banner has greeted CSA members since 2003, our second season, when member Derek Colclough, a fine artist who lived on Classon Avenue, painted it as his volunteer commitment (and it probably took him a few more than 4 hours!). 

Like many CSA members from our early years, Derek’s children were enrolled in the Lafayette Avenue playgroup and, later, the Dillon Center. So when he designed the banner, it was natural for him to think about veggies—and small children. One day he arrived at the CSA with the unfinished banner and several different colors of paint. Every child who showed up that day got to pick a color and put his or her handprints on the banner. 

Derek’s family is long gone from the neighborhood, but I love the fact that his contribution to the CSA is still proudly displayed at our entrance. The preschoolers who decorated the banner are in high school and even college, and a fresh crop of little ones (I mean children, not veggies!) seems to arrive every year.

Ruth Katcher

Core coordinator


from REAL SIMPLE

from REAL SIMPLE

Strawberry Buttermilk Pops

Ingredients

  • 1 pound hulled strawberries
  • 1 cup buttermilk
  • 1 cup plain greek yogurt
  • 1/2 cup honey
  • 1/4 cup sugar
  • pinch of fine salt

Directions

1.  Puree the strawberries, buttermilk, yogurt honey sugar and salt in a blender until smooth

2. Pour the mixture into 10 3-ounce or 8 4-ounce ice-pop molds, dividing evenly. Insert ice-pop sticks and freeze until firm, at least 4 hours and up to 4 days.

3.  ENJOY!!

 

Ratatouille Season Has Begun!

Tomatoes, Eggplants, peppers and zucchini are the foundation for the classic french country dish.  Here's a few different versions to try out!

Ratatouille Skillet Breakfast Stata

One Pot Easy Classic Ratatouille

Julia Child's Ratatouille

 

How to Store:

TOMATOES:  They are best kept on the counter in a cool spot, out of direct sunlight.  Keeping them in the fridge hurts their flavor, and causes them to become mealy.

EGGPLANTS:  Also best kept on the counter in a cool spot, next to your tomatoes!

 

 

THE BEET: Volume 14, Issue 6

IN THIS WEEKS BEET:

  1. This week's share
  2. Letter from Ted & Windflower Farm
  3. Knowing where your meat comes from: The 'COOL' Act could be overturned!
  4. Recipes
  5. Storage tips

Pick Up Today: 5:30 to 7:30pm at PS 56 on the Corner of Gates and Downing


FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP


This Week's Share:

  • summer squashes or zucchini 
  • cucumbers
  • onions
  • broccoli
  • tomatoes
  • radishes or turnips
  • young salad mix

Letter From Ted & Windflower Farm

This has been the hottest day of summer thus far, with the temperature hitting 87 degrees. At last, it’s squash and sweet potato weather. It is Sunday, and because I snuck away yesterday for a day of sailing with my son Nathaniel, Jan tells me it’s my turn to water the greenhouses. Watering has once again become a time-consuming chore because our houses are again full, this time with the seedlings that, when mature, will fill your shares in September and October. Radicchio, fennel, broccoli, white, green and orange cauliflower, red cabbage, lettuces and other greens, squashes, and two downy mildew-resistant varieties: a cucumber and a basil. 

Field seeding carries on: fall roots are going in, as are herbs and salad greens.  And we have been plowing under a sod in our new field in preparation for cover crop seeding. We plowed under an alfalfa and grass sod and are making sure the perennial grasses don’t come back with regular tillage throughout July. In early August we’ll sow hairy vetch and rye, a practice we like because the cover crops will fix nitrogen and carbon for our next vegetables. Organic farming in a nutshell is about feeding the soil microbial community a diet of cover crops and compost so that they, in turn, feed our next crop of vegetables. Bacteria and fungi consume organic matter, transforming it into plant-available nutrients. Nate was plowing at one end of the field and I will tilling at the other when, on a strip of grass between us, a large, grey fox came trotting past, reminding me that our farm is only partially domesticated.

Have a great week, Ted


"Country of Origin Labeling" Act Could Be Overturned

Knowing where your food comes from is getting even more challenging.  There is a move in Congress to overturn the "COOL" act.  This bill requires the country of origin to be labeled on all meat packaging.  That's right- they want to overturn it, so we no longer know where the animal was born, raised and processed.  The argument being that the labels are causing people to be unnecessarily biased since the country of origin does not reflect any difference in USA "regulations."  Whether to not that is true- it is certainly a move away from knowing what you're eating!  [Article in Reference] 


New Products from Lewis Waite Collective Farms

Looking for safe, locally raised meats?  All LWF animals are pasture raised- meaning the animals live out in the fields and are able to graze and forage for their foods.  If you have any questions about the animals or the products they offer- please email them, they are quick to respond.  Here's a quick update on some of the new products they are offering a la carte:

  • dried organic beans: mung, great northern & pinto
  • farmer ground fresh flour
  • fresh buffalo - various cuts
  • chops and bacon
  • New Cheeses: Cambridge, Jane's Raw Milk Cheddar Cheese,  & Londonderry 

Recipe from Mommy's Martini, photo courtesy of Anne

Recipe from Mommy's Martini, photo courtesy of Anne

Multi-Grain Zucchini Bread

(oven & bread machine friendly)

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs
  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 1 1/3 cups grated zucchini (about 3 little guys from our share)
  • 2/3 cup sugar
  • 1 cup flour
  • 3/4 cup oats
  • 1/4 cup corn meal
  • 1 1/2 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1 tsp. baking soda
  • 3/4 tsp. baking powder
  • 1/4 tsp. salt

Directions

BREAD MAKER:  Put all the ingredients into the bread maker in order.  Select the Quick Bread/Cake Cycle.  This makes a small loaf (about 1 lb).  I recommend taking your loaf out about 15 minutes before the cycle ends.  Otherwise it dries out a little.

OVEN:  Combine all ingredients together and mix well.  Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.  Pour batter into 9x5 loaf pan, or muffin tins.  Bake for 40-50 min for a loaf- or 15-20 minutes for muffins.  Test loaf with a tooth pick- if it comes out clean, then your loaf is done.

 


Zucchini 5 Ways from The KitchN

Zucchini 5 Ways from The KitchN

Go HERE for 5 delicious ideas from The KitchN on what do with all your zucchini! 

Storage Tips Summer Squash

Zucchini, Summer Squash & Tomatoes should be stored unwashed in the refrigerator, or left out on the counter.  Wash right before using.

QUICK GUIDE TO STORING VEGETABLES AND FRUIT WITHOUT PLASTIC

Start to minimize all the plastic in your life!  In a lot cases plastic slowly leaches chemicals onto your food- especially at hot or cold temperatures.  It also is rapidly filling up our landfills with things that will take hundreds of years to decompose.  Above are some plastic free storage tips!