THE BEET: VOLUME 16; ISSUE 3

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing

Reminders:

Sign up for your volunteer hours now! The CSA is a community endeavor that runs primarily on member labor. Shifts tend to fill up toward the end of the season, so get your work in now! Sign up HERE

Bring bags for your veggies! We have a few plastic bags for those who forget, but it's important to remember to bring your own bags and containers for your veggies and other shares.

If you have any Beet submissions, please feel free to contribute! We'd love to have our members represented in these pages. Send recipes, neighborhood news, food articles to newsletter@clintonhillcsa.org

This Week's Share

·        Kale varieties

·        Broccoli

·        Squashes

·        Swiss chard

·        Hakurei turnips

·        Potted Herbs

·        Fruit Share: Strawberries

Eggs and Fruit are here! Come pick up if you have these optional shares. Flower Shares will start in the coming few weeks. 

From Windflower Farm

Our farm season starts at the end of February, when we dust the snow off our greenhouses, test fire heaters and fans and water supplies, and sow our first onion and tomato seeds. We spend the first 60 days of the season in the greenhouse producing the tens of thousands of seedlings that will fill out our fields once the outdoor growing season gets underway in late April. It might be winter outside, but in the greenhouse it feels as though we’ve taken a trip to the deep south.

The next sixty days of the season - the last two months of spring - are always something of a marathon here at Windflower Farm. This is the part of the season when this vegetable farmer’s life is at its most hectic and stressful. Our target first planting day is April 21st, when any remaining snow is usually confined to north-facing hedgerows, and by June 21st, the start of summer, and longest day of the year, we hope to have the farm fully planted to all but the later successional crops and to have made several deliveries to the city.

Here is a short list of our accomplishments to-date: we have planted about two acres each of "Irish" potatoes, sweet potatoes, onions and other alliums, winter squashes, various greens, sweet corn and cut flowers. We have planted an acre or so each of green beans; root crops like beets, carrots and radishes; Brassicas (cabbages and broccoli); and Cucurbits (cukes, zukes and melons). And we’ve made several smaller plantings of arugula, celery, mustard mixes and herbs. We’ve planted two large greenhouses to tomatoes and a third to cut flowers. And we’ve planted 24 small greenhouses (150’ long structures we call “caterpillar tunnels”) to a combination of tomatoes, peppers, eggplants, cucumbers, basil and cut flowers. In addition, we put in a new quarter acre of elderberries and a half acre of table grapes. It’s been a busy 60 days!

Those first 60 days in the field tell us much about how the season will go. And so I thought I’d share some slightly scattered observations and give you a sense of what to expect. Mother Nature, a full partner in the farm, gave us some challenges. It was an unusually cold and wet spring, as you know, which threw off our planting schedule and will delay some (but certainly not all) harvests. So, where are we? 

I expect tomatoes, peppers, chiles and eggplants, in particular, to be a little later than usual, but our use of tunnels has been helpful and you should see these items showing up in early August shares. I’m grateful for the recent arrival of warm sunny weather. It is bringing on squashes and cucumbers a little earlier than expected. Squash starts this week, cucumbers should start the week after. 

Greens, strawberries, alliums, cabbages and potatoes all like cool, wet springs, and they are happy, if slightly delayed. We are trying to avoid giving you too many greens, but we continue to send them because we want to fill out your shares. Green onions will be showing up fairly soon and will become a regular weekly feature. Sweet corn does not like cool temperatures, nor do beans, and they will be later. My fear is that my four corn plantings all comes in at once! Garlic scapes are coming next week, and garlic bulbs a month after that, right on schedule. Kohlrabi continues to mature, turnips start this week, beets are coming soon, and carrots will start in early August. Eating seasonally is always full of surprises.

Every week, we’ll post an image or two from the farm on Instagram (here). You can also find us on Facebook (here), where you’ll find recipes and can exchange information with farm staff and fellow CSA members. You can reach the farm by sending an email to Andrea, our membership coordinator, at windflowercsa@gmail.com.

Enjoy the week. Best wishes, Ted and Jan

 

THE BEET: VOLUME 16; ISSUE 2

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


Reminders:

Sign up for your volunteer hours now! The CSA is a community endeavor that runs primarily on member labor. Shifts tend to fill up toward the end of the season, so get your work in now! Sign up HERE

Bring bags for your veggies! We have a few plastic bags for those who forget, but it's important to remember to bring your own bags and containers for your veggies and other shares.

If you have any Beet submissions, please feel free to contribute! We'd love to have our members represented in these pages. Send recipes, neighborhood news, food articles to newsletter@clintonhillcsa.org


This Week's Share

  • Swiss Chard or Broccoli Rabe
  • Scallions
  • Lettuces
  • Lacinatio (Dinosaur) or Red Russian Kale
  • Arugula
  • Green Kohlrabi
  • Potted Herbs
  • Fruit Share: Strawberries

Eggs and Fruit are here! Come pick up if you have these optional shares. Flower Shares will start in the coming few weeks. 

From Windflower Farm

As you’d imagine, we have daily encounters with wildlife here on the farm. Last weekend, as I was returning to the field to work on our sweet potatoes, I saw a doe and her spotted twins bedded down in the rye stubble in the field next door. It was bad news for us; deer love sweet potato vines and could easily destroy our entire crop if given enough time. I knew to be alert to them because deer had been eating our celeriac in a nearby field. But I was a little surprised. Last year, I spent quite a bit of money on a perimeter fence to avoid just such an event. Apparently, gates had been left open. Deer don’t associate tractors with danger, so I was able to get quite close. The doe eventually darted off, leaving her little ones to hunker down, trying to be invisible, a strategy for which all those spots might be helpful. But they were only a couple of weeks old and easy to catch. Warm, soft, boney-ribbed, all legs, and wild, they bleated loudly once I got them into my arms. Fifty yards away or so, the doe snorted and stomped, while the fawns wriggled and kicked. One got away and disappeared in the brush. I set the other little one just outside the gate, hoping the doe would lead them out once I was no longer a threat. At that point, I thought, I would close the gate, locking them outside of our farm and away from your vegetables. All were gone when I returned an hour later to close the gate, leaving no indication whether they had found a hiding spot within my perimeter or without.

This week’s share contents.

This week you’ll be getting Swiss chard or broccoli rabe, depending on what you got last week, scallions, lettuces, your choice of dinosaur or Red Russian kale, arugula, green kohlrabi, and your choice of another potted herb. Next week, you’ll get more spring salad crops, including sweet Japanese turnips, garlic scapes and spinach. Our cucumbers and zucchinis are doing well, and they should begin showing up with broccoli during week four or five. Our Chandler strawberries continue to come in and will be in your fruit share. As our organic early variety slows, we’ll reach out to Pete at Yonder Farm to provide later strawberries and rhubarb. Cherries and blueberries will come in afterwards.  

Every week, we’ll post an image or two from the farm on Instagram (here). You can also find us on Facebook (here), where you’ll find recipes and can exchange information with farm staff and fellow CSA members. You can reach the farm by sending an email to Andrea, our membership coordinator, at windflowercsa@gmail.com.

Enjoy the week. Best wishes, Ted and Jan


NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS

Longtime CSA member Julio Grinblatt is showing a series of his beautiful photographs at Minus Space in Dumbo. The series, Pasillos, depicts the experience of his first two years as an immigrant in New York City. Here is the gallery's write up of the show and some great press about Julio and his work. See you there!

THE BEET: Volume 16; Issue 1

THE BEET: Volume 16; Issue 1

June 8, 2017

FIRST PICK UP TONIGHT!

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing

This Week's Share

  • Potted Herbs
  • Swiss Chard
  • Lacinato (dinosaur) or Red Russian Kale 
  • Scallions
  • Lettuce
  • Bok Choy
  • Arugula

Egg Share starts this week, Fruit Shares start next week, and Flower Shares start in the next two to three weeks!

From Windflower Farm

Spring greetings from all of us at Windflower Farm! Thank you for joining our CSA – we are very happy that you decided to be with us! It's been a hectic 45 days since our first field plantings, but I believe we are ready! Your first share of the season will be arriving on Thursday of this week.

Your first share will consist of potted herbs, which you can keep on a windowsill, plant in a garden, or use in a dish in the next week or two. There will be more of these during the next few weeks. You’ll get Swiss chard and your choice of lacinato (aka, dinosaur) or Red Russian kale. You’ll also get a bunch of scallions, heads of lettuce and bok choy and a bunch of arugula. Egg shares start this week, too, with fresh brown eggs from the Davis’s pasture-fed hens. Flower shares will start in another two or three weeks. Fruit shares will likely start next week. We would have started with our own strawberries this week, but the rainfall ruined the red-ripe fruit. Don’t worry - there are all kinds of green fruits that will be turning red in the coming heat.

We hope you enjoy your first share of the season. Next week, we’ll be sending more of these salad vegetables, along with broccoli rabe and radishes or kohlrabi. The unusually cold and grey May will keep us guessing about when crops will be maturing this spring and early summer, but we’ll do our best to keep you informed. (My solar panels actually produced more electricity in April than May!)

The first half dozen shares in our 22-week season generally consist of cool-season salad crops. Cucumbers, squashes and sweet turnips will begin to fill out your shares before June is out. Broccoli will be soon to follow. And by the end of July, sweet peppers, tomatoes, eggplants, cabbage and sweet corn should appear regularly in your weekly share. Good things are coming!

In the weeks ahead, I’ll use this space to introduce you to our excellent farm team, and I’ll tell you a good deal about the crops we grow and how we grow them. Every week, we’ll post an image or two from the farm on Instagram (here). You can also find us on Facebook (here), where you’ll find recipes and can exchange information with farm staff and fellow CSA members. You can reach the farm by sending an email to Andrea, our membership coordinator, at windflowercsa@gmail.com. Don’t hesitate to tell us what you are thinking

 

Save the Food!

The amount of produce in a weekly share is awesome but can occasionally feel overwhelming—here's a great website that outlines the environmental consequences of wasting food and helps you avoid doing so with all the bounty that's currently overflowing from your fridge. Check out the storage tips to keep your CSA booty kicking all week long. 

Recipes

Make the most of your kale with 32 delish kale-centric recipes from Bon Appetit. Personally I'm a big fan of lazy person's kale—thrown in a big bowl with whatever grain and cheese you have lying around and finished off with olive oil, lemon, and a little crushed red pepper. 

Enjoy Friday's Full Strawberry Moon!

http://www.bonappetit.com/recipes/slideshow/kale-recipes

THE BEET: Volume 15; Issue 22

FINAL PICK UP TONIGHT

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


Dear Clinton Hill CSA members,

As our 15th season comes to an end, we'd like to thank you for being a part of our Clinton Hill CSA community. From your enthusiasm and anticipation at the start of the season to your cheerful volunteer shifts to your astonishing generosity in the wake of the fruit share difficulties, we've appreciated everything you've given us this year. In a world of big media, big box stores, and large corporations, the CSA is the essence of small and personal—or, at least, we hope it is. Whether you're a new member trying out the CSA or part of our longstanding crew, we're so happy you've shared the season with us, and we hope to see you again next spring. In the meantime, check out our winter share and see if it's for you, and enjoy the very last distribution of our 2016 season!

     Best wishes,
          The Clinton Hill CSA Core


This Week's Share

  • Yellow or red onions and
  • Leeks
  • Sweet potatoes
  • ‘Delicata’ squashes
  • Choice of:  sage, lemongrass and Rosemary
  • Chiles
  • Spinach and a lettuce mix
  • Choices of two bunches of greens:  kale, choy, chard, escarole, collards and a mustard mix
Season's first snowfall at Windflower Farm - October 27th

Season's first snowfall at Windflower Farm - October 27th

From Windflower Farm

As you already know, this week’s delivery is the last of our ‘summer’ season. On behalf of our staff and the farmers we work with to deliver fruit and egg shares, Jan and I would like to express our thanks to all of you for your membership in the Windflower Farm community. Your purchase of a share in our farm’s 2016 vegetable and flower harvest made possible the employment of some 18 people grateful for the good work of growing healthy food in a sustainable way. We appreciate that you have shared in the adventure of navigating a season long on hot weather and short on rainfall. As is the case every year, there were successes and failures, too many of some things, and too few of others. That you are with us, rooting for us, and that as shareholders you have “skin in the game,” adds immeasurably to the meaning of our labors. We hope you have enjoyed your shares of vegetables, cut flowers, fruits, and eggs and your connection to our farm, and we hope to see you again next year.

We value your thoughts and ask that you provide us with your responses to our end-of-season survey. It should be available midweek next week.

The CSA model continues to thrive because of the active participation of people in their food system. That includes all of you, of course, but there is a special group of you who make a substantially extra effort. In each neighborhood where we deliver, we work with a “core group” of your fellow shareholders who volunteer to organize a school, church, garden or stretch of sidewalk into a weekly distribution site. They promote the CSA, “sell” shares, write newsletters, gather recipes, sort out site logistics, coordinate volunteers, arrange special events and maintain a constant dialog with the farm. They are certainly underpaid, but they are not underappreciated. Our small farm would not exist without their efforts. To them, we say, thank you, thank you, thank you!

This need not be goodbye - winter shares are still available! - but if it is, we’d like to extend our warmest wishes for the season.

Our very best regards, Ted and Jan


Winter Share Sign-Up!

The winter share is comprised of four once-a-month deliveries of our stored squashes, onions, leeks, carrots, beets, turnips, potatoes, sweet potatoes, and fresh salad greens from our greenhouses, along with apples, pears and either cider or jam. We hope you’ll join us!

Sign Up Here


Delicata Squash:  Your new favorite winter squash

Delicata squash are my favorite winter squash.  Their flavor is smooth and slightly sweet.  They only get better when roasted, and best of all- you can eat the skin!  No peeling involved!  To clean, all you have to do is wash & remove the seeds.   Delicata squash are native to North America- originally cultivated by Native Americans.  They are rich in beta-carotene, and a good source of fiber, potassium, vitamins C & B, magnesium & manganese.

Here's a variety of ways to try them, if you haven't all ready.

In a Quiche!  Tho this recipe calls for roasted butternut, delicata can easily be subbed.  I have put it in quiche many times for a sweeter twist on my savory breakfast pie.  Taste and Tell Quiche.

Chickpeas with Delicata Squash, Kale and Coconut milk.  Sauteed and served over brown rice or farrow for a complete and healthy dinner.  From Healthy Green Kitchen

Italian Style- cut in half and baked with cream and parmigiano cheese.

Pan-Asian Style; Miso Sesame Winter Squash.  From one of my favorite cooking blogs; 101 Cookbooks.

Sweet Potato Breakfast Bread!  Do yourself a favor, turn the oven on and make yourself a delicious loaf.  While baking it will make the whole apartment smell good, and when it's done- it will fly off the cutting board.  This bread goes well with all meals- especially breakfast and second breakfast.

THE BEET: Volume 15; Issue 21

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


FINAL PICK UP NEXT WEEK FOR FULL & YELLOW HALF SHARES

FINAL PICK UP FOR FRUIT SHARES & GREEN HALF SHARES TONIGHT


Reminders & Links:

Winter Share Sign up HERE!

Lewis Waite CSA Extras: They have a lot of new fall products; including flours, organic chickens, lamb, half baked pizzas, mushroom teas and cheeses!  Sign up for extra goodies to fill out your final share for next week! 

Please take a few minutes to fill out our end of the year survey HERE.  It helps us and Ted prepare for next year's season.

Anniversary Party Postponed! We (The CHCSA Core) have decided to postpone the 15th Anniversary Party for a little bit, we will send everyone a proper invite when the time comes.  In the meantime- if you signed up to volunteer for the party- we would welcome your help at next week's pick up instead.  There is a bit more set up and clean up involved on the final night- as Ted sends the vegetables in plastic bags & cardboard boxes.  Thank you!


This Week's Share:

  • Spinach and ‘Lollo Rossa’ lettuce or a lettuce mix
  • Leeks, garlic and onions
  • A choice between potatoes and beets
  • Your choice of three greens: kale, choy, chard, escarole, collards and a ‘Tokyo Bekana’ mix
  • A last taste of summer – peppers, chiles, cilantro and a tomato
  • Fruit Share: Cortland Apples & Bosc Pears

 

Letter From Windflower Farm:

It has rained for two days and now a cold wind is blowing. The brilliant red and orange leaves of last week have fallen, and, although our young cover crops are a bright green, the larger landscape is becoming a more muted gold. A light snow is expected on Thursday morning. We are all taking a little more care with our clothing selections – gloves, hats, sweaters and rain gear litter the staff room. The tunnels have been battened down and soon we’ll apply additional layers of covers over our baby greens. The field season is clearly winding down. The local farm staff is looking forward to a short break before preparation of winter shares begins. The staff from Laguna Prieta, in Mexico – Martin, Monica and Martin Jr. – are excited to be heading home, where family and sweethearts await them. And after their reunion, and a week or so of rest, they have a family farm to attend. Martin grows the subsistence crops, corn, beans and squash, with which he feeds his family and their livestock, and the cash crops, onions and cabbage, which he barters at the local store. Soon, it will be harvest time there, but because his family is large, Martin says, the work does not take long and there is plenty of time for relaxation and festivities.

The “off season” for us means turning our attention to the tractors and equipment that require maintenance. That and a small barn upgrade will keep me busy this winter. But Nate has some more creative endeavors in mind for his spare time. He is a part of the “makers” movement, and is interested in small DIY electric planting and harvesting aids and tractors. So, he’ll be in our workshop for much of the time from November through next April, and I’m really curious to see what he makes for our next season. When she’s not catching up with the farm’s accounting, Jan, too, will keep busy in her workshop. But, her interests are a little more multidimensional than ours, and she’ll be focused more on art this winter.

I hope your “off season” is every bit as exciting as ours.

Best regards, Ted


Recipes to warm you up:

It's definitely time to put your slow cooker out on the counter if you haven't all ready done so.  Coming home to a hot, home made meal is one of the most satisfying feelings.  There's a lot of things you can do with a good slow cooker that you may not have thought of such as:

Apple Crisp.  By using paper towels under the lid; you can keep the top crispy, and the bottom warm and gooey.  Here's a guideline which you can alter however you want to make your family's crisp just right.

Chocolate- Pear Cake.  It's just as good as it sounds.  And sometimes it's ok to have cake for dinner, or at least before.

Spice up your holiday party with some slow cooker mulled cider.  Mulled cider goes well with all fall and winter festivities or to warm up the family after a long day out in the snow/ colder weather.

Finally- here's a great comprehensive list of 50 delicious slow cooker meals put together by ohmyveggies.  I love this list because it's organized by courses: Mains, sides, breakfasts & desserts.

THE BEET: Volume 15; Issue 20

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


A Few Reminders:

Please Sign up for our Winter Share:  https://windflowerfarm.wufoo.com/forms/m1xr27rk05nzoa8/

The winter share is four once-a-month deliveries of root crops (our own stored roots, bulbs and tubers), fresh salad greens, apples, pears and either cider or jam. We hope you’ll join us!

Halloween Party!  Next Week On Site during Distribution:  We'd love to see our youngest members in costume, and anyone else who want to dress up!  All festivities are welcome!

November 1:  CHCSA 15th Anniversary Party - Save the Date!


CHCSA Survey

Please Take our end of the season survey.  It's quick (less than 15 minutes) and helps us and Ted improve our CSA for next season.  Click Here to Begin!


This Week's Share

  • ‘Magenta’ lettuce
  • Garlic and fennel fronds
  • Butternut squash
  • Carrots
  • Kale, choy, chard, radicchio, collards and mustard mix
  • Fennel bulbs or beets
  • Onion bulbs or leeks
  • Potatoes or sweet potatoes

 

Letter From Ted & Windflower Farm

We wrapped up the planting of our winter greens on Monday. We have planted eleven small greenhouses and three larger ones. I’ll post images to our Instagram page this week. We’ve planted one kind of spinach, two kale varieties, three lettuce mixes, two choy varieties and Swiss chard. We don’t heat our greenhouses. Instead, we plant them now, which is timed to bring them all to maturity by Thanksgiving, and then allow them to “rest” under floating row covers until harvest at any point during the winter. In this way, we can have fresh greens in a Northeastern winter without the use of electricity or fossil fuels. It’s wonderfully rewarding to be able to head out my back door on a cold January afternoon, walk across a snowy lawn to a greenhouse, and harvest a bowlful of fresh salad greens.

We will begin planting garlic later this week. Between now and the end of the season, we will either plant everything we have left or send it to you (you should get garlic every week until the end of the season). We expect to plant eight or nine 400’ beds. Nate fertilized and pre-shaped the beds two weeks ago, and I’ll lay the mulch and drip irrigation tomorrow. Once planted and covered, there is little for us to do except uncover and weed in the spring. This is the garlic that will provide next spring’s scapes and next fall’s bulbs.  And next week, we will begin planting much of next year’s onion crop. Perhaps more about this in weeks to come.

We have been spending more and more time in the kitchen with the return of cool weather. And soups have dominated our fall menus. Tonight, it was Hungarian Mushroom, which actually had very little besides onions from our own farm. But last week’s lineup included much from your shares: Carrot Ginger Dill Coconut Soup, Butternut Squash Soup, Potato Leek Soup, Thai Coconut Lemongrass Soup with Tofu and Broccoli, and On-the-Mend Lentil Soup with Carrots. Later in the week we plan to try a Greens Soup in Coconut Milk with Polenta. We’ve been out hiking among the fall foliage – just spectacular this year! – and find that warm soup in a thermos is just the thing to have along.

Have a great week! Ted  

Fall settling in at the farm.

Fall settling in at the farm.


Recipe Ideas

I too, like Ted, have been making soups.  I love making a big pot, so there's lots of leftovers when times are tight during week night dinners.  This past week I made this delicious Farrow and Navy Bean Soup - it's extremely comforting with a loaf of fresh olive bread, and a simple green salad.

I would also recommend trying African Sweet Potato Stew.  If you've never had it- it may sound strange (there's peanut butter in the soup) but it's incredibly delicious, and economical!  You should have everything you need from the CSA and cupboard basics.  Here's a basic recipe, but there are other more sophisticated variations out there.  It will fill you up!  And it goes well with a fresh loaf of crusty sourdough bread.

Lastly- Here is a phenomenal Butternut Squash Soup recipe, by Bed-Stuy Super Chef, Bryant Terry.  It's by far my favorite variation of this soup.  Instead of apples and onions, he uses Bartlet Pears and leeks- which really show off the richness of the squash, and folding in the coconut milk at the ends gives you a very creamy, rich soup.  Happy Cooking!

THE BEET: Volume 15; Issue 19

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share

  • The last of our tomatoes
  • Sweet Peppers or broccoli
  • A braising mix
  • The red crisp head lettuce, ‘Magenta’
  • Kale or Swiss chard
  • Bunched ‘teenaged’ carrots
  • Leeks
  • Sweet Potatoes
  • Pie pumpkins
  • Garlic
  • Fennel bulbs and fronds
  • Fruit Share is Gala Apples & Bosc Pears from Yonder Farm

Sign Up for Winter Shares Here!
 

We hope that you will choose to take advantage of Ted's Winter Share.  It's 4 deliveries, once a month November - February.  It's always comforting to get some home grown veggies & provisions to get you through the chilly months, and to spruce up your holiday meals.


Fall Foliage and Friends at Windflower Farm

Fall Foliage and Friends at Windflower Farm

From Windflower Farms

The first truly killing frost is expected tomorrow night (last week’s was just a dress rehearsal), and tomorrow we’ll be busy applying row covers to the lettuces and other tender greens that will fill out the final shares of the season. It’s one of the latest first hard frosts we’ve ever had, in a year in which temperatures here and around the world have been warmer than ever. It might seem nice to have a warm fall (we are certainly grateful that we are not harvesting in the cold), but these warm seasons come at a cost. Last year’s warmest winter ever produced this year’s buggiest summer ever. Colorado potato beetles and striped cucumber beetles and flea beetles were out of control this year because they survived the mellow winter in large numbers. And they brought diseases and reduced yields with them. Global warming will be challenging for farmers no matter where they are. At Windflower Farm, our expectation is that global warming will bring greater uncertainty and the need to upgrade our spraying equipment and irrigating infrastructure. But back to good news: In the course of deciding what crops to cover today, Nate performed a field inventory of greens. And he reported that we have good looking fall crops of arugula, mustard mixes, choy, kales, collards, chards, spinach, lettuces, radicchio, and escarole – the makings of all kinds of soups, salads and braising greens. We hope you enjoy them.

Have a great week, Ted and Jan


Recipe Ideas: It's Pie Season

Ted's passing the ball with the baking pumpkin he's sending our way, and as the cool winds are here, I think it's finally safe to turn on the oven.  Have you tried sweet potato pie?  Here's a couple variations:  the traditional style from ChowHound,  a basic version from the Times for the minimalist bakers out there, and for those who want something different- try this savory sweet potato pie recipe.  There's even kale in it!  It looks good for breakfast.

Pumpkin Pies: don't wait until the end of November to use that baking pumpkin!  Cut it in half length-wise, oil it down and stick it on the oven (face up)  at 400 degrees for 50- 60 minutes.   When it's done, let it cool, scoop out all the flesh and puree in the cuisinart.  You can then freeze it (and save it for a Thanksgiving pie) or use it right away in one of these recipes and give your Thanksgiving Pie a test drive before the big day!

Traditional Pumpkin Pie Recipe from The Kitchn

19 Variations on Pumpkin Pie compiled by Huffington Post- everything from boozy pies, to s'mores pumpkin pie, to German style Streusel Pie!

Finally, because I don't want the apple lovers to be left out, here's a classic apple pie recipe with 6 variations from Love from the Oven.

Bon Appetit!

 

THE BEET: Volume 15; Issue 18

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


A Few Announcements

Be sure to sign up for your volunteer hours if you haven't already!

EVENTS:  please put our two end-of-season events on your calendar: our Halloween party during distribution on Thursday, October 27 (we'd love to see our youngest members in costume!) and our 15th anniversary party on Tuesday, November 1. More details coming soon. If you've signed up for volunteer hours on site but want to contribute to our party efforts, please get in touch with us at information@clintonhillcsa.org, and we'll get back to you soon! Please don't cancel your on-site distribution hours, though.

And all payments are due now; if you're not sure what you owe, email us at treasurer@clintonhillcsa.org


This Week's Share

  • Arugula                                              
  • Adolescent Lettuces
  • Braising Mix                                      
  • Chiles or Tomatillos
  • Cilantro                                             
  • Yellow Onions
  • Sweet Peppers                                  
  • Miscellaneous Tomatoes
  • Squashes                                          
  • Fingerling Potatoes
  • Fruit Share: Bosc Pears & Empire Apples from Yonder Farm

 

Letter From Windflower Farm

It’s nearly time to sign up for a Windflower Farm winter share. The winter share is four once-a-month deliveries of our own organic salad greens (including kales, spinach, Swiss chard, tatsoi and others), plus winter squashes, carrots, beets, onions, leeks, potatoes and sweet potatoes. Each month, we also include apples and pears (if we can get them) from Yonder Farm, and either apple cider from Borden Farm or jams made from our own organic strawberries and blackberries. To make it even more interesting we’ll occasionally include our own popcorn, black turtle beans, garlic and dried chiles. The winter share is delivered on Saturdays to a location very near your current pickup site. We hope you’ll join us for the winter share. It keeps us off the streets of Easton, money in the pockets of my staff, and it’s really yummy stuff. Look for a sign-up form in the next week or two. 

This week’s share is likely to be the last that includes all the makings of a good salsa. Summer has truly come to its end here; a frost last week left the lawn frosty and singed the tops of our low-lying sweet potatoes. We have nearly completed our fall harvests. In fact, all we have left in the field are sweet potatoes, leeks, bunching carrots and beets, storage turnips and fall greens. Red and orange foliage is popping up in the landscape. Your final tomatoes of the season may come as early as next week. And then it’s on to the crops of fall, starting next week with the likes of sweet potatoes, fennel, carrots and garlic, along with an assortment of greens.

There is a period of time each fall, between the final harvest of our storage crops and the start of winter, when we can complete a project unrelated to our crops. This year, it’s an expansion of one of our outbuildings. In modest stages we try to improve the infrastructure of our farm. This project will give us improved staff living quarters. So, this week, we’ll put the backhoe back on the John Deere and start digging. By this time next week, we should have poured the concrete piers and begun erecting the frame. If all goes well, we’ll have a roof and siding on before the first snowfall.

Have a great week, Ted


Recipe Ideas

As Ted is saying this week is the last week for salsa fixin's, I thought I would recommend a few latin inspired dishes.  For everyone who doesn't want to turn the oven on- try this Mexican Quinoa Salad from The Minimalist Baker.  It has a lot going on to satisfy all the taste buds- sweet, salty, savory, and looks like it could easily keep for lunch the next day.

I love this simple polenta recipe from the Moosewood.  They call for spinach- but you could use any green- and basically suggests you top it with Pico de Gallo.  Go here for Spinach Polenta and here for their killer Pico recipe.  You could also put Tomatillo Mole Sauce on top of this.

For something a little more special- a good weekend dinner, try this recipe from Cafe Pasqual's in Santa Fe:  Grilled Chipotle Shrimp Tostadas.  I was recently in Santa Fe, and had the privilege to eat at Pasqual's; it's everything you've every wanted from Southwest Home cooking. 


Around Town

NYC's Wine and Food festival is coming up!  It's 4 days of food events, celebrity chefs, cooking demonstrations, seminars and workshops on topics all things food related.  And the best part is that 100% of the proceeds go to charity.  When:  October 13-16.  Event schedules and tickets here.

Local Apple Picking:: If you're looking to something a little more intimate and relaxing- here's a list of the best farms in the NYC vicinity for you and your clan to go apple picking!  So many delicious things can be made with apples, and they're all the more sweeter- if you picked them yourself.

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 17

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share

  • Bunched Baby Lettuce
  • Koji or Mustard Mix
  • Kale
  • Leeks
  • Squashes
  • Purple potatoes
  • Peppers
  • Chiles
  • Tomatoes
  • Sweet corn
  • Macintosh apples and Bartlett pears

Letter from Windflower Farm

The bean and corn season has come to a close here, and summer squashes and tomatoes are winding down rapidly. Temperatures have cooled considerably, and foliage has already begun to turn. In the Northeast, the farm season can shut down quickly. A near freeze Monday morning nearly caught us off guard. Next week, look for mixed baby lettuces, arugula, a mustard mix, winter squashes, potatoes, peppers, tomatoes, onions, garlic and the last of our chiles and cilantro (perhaps a last batch of salsa). In the final five weeks of the season, summer crops will give way to the crops of fall and winter: carrots, beets, turnips, potatoes, sweet potatoes, onions, leeks, garlic, winter squashes, cold-hardy greens and cabbage – all the makings for wonderful soups, stews and roasts. It’s a season of heavy lifting. Roots are dug from the earth. We might have the aid of a harvester, but generally its function is to loosen the crop from the soil around it or, at best, to pull the crop out of the earth and redeposit it on the soil surface. It’s bend-over work: pull it out or pick it up, put it into a tote or bin, lift the tote onto a wagon or pallet, tuck it into the barn. So, our bend-overs are tired. But it is just a passing part of the season, and soon enough we’ll have filled our barns and coolers and garage.    
Fruit shares resumed last week and will continue for a total of six weeks this fall. This week, it’s Macintosh or Goldie apples (if you got one last week, you’ll get the other this week) and Bartlett pears. A variety of other apples and bosc pears and cider are all to come.    

A gentle rain fell this morning. It’s been all too rare this season, and this one was light and short lived. But I think it was enough to insure the germination of our most recently seeded cover crops (this one a mix of rye, oats, peas and vetch) and boost along the young greens (arugula, braising mixes, kales, spinach, Swiss chard, tatsoi and choys) that will fill out your final shares of the season.    

All the best, Ted and the farm team   


Recipe Ideas

I think it's official, with the lower temperatures, and rain that fall is coming, and with fall it's Chili Time!  Here's a few different recipes to try- all involving fresh veggies.

Cookie & Kate's Fresh Veggie Chili

Black Bean Chili with Summer Squashes

The Food Lab at Serious Eats gets the low down on perfecting the perfect chili.

 


Around Town

Chili Pepper Festival at Brooklyn Botanical Garden!

Get your chilies to make Chili!  New York's hottest fall tradition features blazing bands from around the world, including African, Cajun, Latin, and Moroccan beats! Feel the burn as you sample hi-scoville sauces from Brooklyn and beyond, shop for spices at Sahadi's souk, and indulge in the heat of artisanal goodies from chile-chocolatiers.

CPF2016_bannerRR2.jpg

Just Outside Town

Tho the weather may be a little gloomy this weekend, if you're looking for something fun to do- I would highly recommend Getting your garlic on! at the Hudson Valley Garlic Festival.  It's in Saugerties NY, just up the NY throughway.  It Saturday and Sunday, rain or shine.  There's farms from all over the Hudson valley selling their heirloom varieties of garlic, and ALL sorts of delicious foods made from garlic.  Also at the festival are food vendors, kids activities, music, and the cute little town of Saugerties itself.  In Saugerties you can stop for lunch at one of the local restaurants, get some delicious home made pickles from The Brine Barrel, or have a brew on the Esopus Creek at the Diamond Mills Hotel.

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 15

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


Fruit Share's to resume next week! They will be delivered for 6 weeks.


This Week's Share

  • Romaine Lettuce
  • Lacinato or Red Russian Kale
  • Bok Choy or Koji at most sites
  • Carrots
  • Snap Beans
  • Sweet Corn at most sites
  • Sweet Peppers
  • Red Onions
  • Miscellaneous Tomatoes
  • And squashes or cucumbers

 

Letter from Windflower Farm

We have just finished bowls of Mexican beans and rice made by my son, Nate. The vegetables, of course, came from here, and they are all in this week’s share. While we ate, Nate described the progress he had made on a project we started recently. Two years ago, we were able to rent an additional 24 acres of farmland from our neighbor, MaryJane. It’s good land, it’s all within reach of our irrigation system, and it is now enclosed by an 8’ deer fence. One of the best things to come of now having a more farmland than we need to produce your vegetables is that we can dedicate a greater proportion of land to cover crops. Cover crops are plants grown solely for the purpose of improving the health of the soil. They enable us to break disease and pesky insect cycles, suppress weeds, and grow our own fertility. One of our summer cover crops was a mix of oats and peas, which produced lush plantings with beautiful lavender blossoms in three separate fields. We have been keeping it mowed and will let the debris protect the soil during winter. These will be the first fields we’ll plant in the spring. Fall cover cropping is now underway. Nate’s recent emphasis has been on wrapping up our mixed rye and hairy vetch plantings. The rye we sow is the same seed we’d plant if we wanted to grow the grain intended for rye flour. It’s a winter annual that produces a good deal of biomass. Hairy vetch is a legume which has the capacity, with the help of bacteria living symbiotically within its roots, of converting atmospheric nitrogen into plant-available nitrogen. Between now and June, the rye will provide the carbon and the vetch will provide the nitrogen that will be the primary foodstuffs of next year’s crops. It’s rice and beans for the soil – a healthy balance of carbohydrates and protein. Later in the fall, once we’ve lost the window for planting vetch, which does poorly if not given the time to develop a good root system, we’ll plant rye alone, and meet the crop’s nitrogen needs in those fields with an application of compost. If we are to meet our fall cover cropping goals, it will be because we’ll have covered the entire farm by the end of October.

Warmly, Ted


Winter Share Host

We are in need of a host for the winter share! The host should ideally live in Fort Greene or Clinton Hill, and have a small out door space such as a porch, or front area in which to hold all the shares during pick up.  They must be able to be on site for two hours on four Saturdays, once a month, starting in November, as well as be able to take a Louis Waite delivery earlier in the day. The host gets a free winter share.  Email me if you're interested, or for more information!


Food Picks & Happenings Around Town

New York Botanical Garden is hosting a Blues, Brews and Botany weekend!  Come listen to some live blues and bluegrass bands, sample some local craft brews, and listen to talks by expert brewers & garden scientists.

Clinton Hill has it's own small farmers market now!  It's - on the corner of Lafayette and Washington, every Tuesday from 8am- 4pm through November 22.  So if you need a couple of extra veggies to get you through the week- stop by and support our neighborhood! 

New York Honey Week is this week!  For a full list of events click here.  This Saturday at the Rockaways & 86th Street is the Bee Marketplace.  There are Honey vendors, beekeeping talks, food & activities.  Family Friendly.  


Food in the News

I saw this article on the alarmingly high rates of fraudulent fish labeling in Time, and had to share. The short of what's happening is seafood vendors are mislabeling fish in order to get a higher pice, and a lot of time putting the consumer at risk.  Notable- Tilefish, was often labled as red snapper.  Tilefish is on the "DO NOT EAT" list for pregnant women due to it's high mercury content.  In addition, many of the fish that were mislabeled were on the endangered species list.  So- it seems clear, when eating seafood- do your best to investigate your source and proceed with caution.

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 14

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


Please Bring Bags! 

We're running low. . .  so if your pile of plastic, paper or re-usable bags is getting too big- please bring some in to share! 

Follow Along!

Join our online community—follow us on Instagram @clintonhillcsa and on Facebook. We love to see pictures of CSA-made recipes and notes on community agriculture!

Sign Up to Volunteer!

The success of our CSA depends absolutely on the participation of our members.  All Full Share households are required to give 4 hours of their time each season. All Half Share households are required to give 2 hours of their time each season! 

If you have not signed up for your volunteer hours for this season, please sign up right away to do so on Volunteer Spot. If your household does not complete your required hours of volunteering, you will not be eligible for early registration next season. Our wait list is over 150 families, and you will likely not get a spot next year. So please, honor your commitment to our CSA and find the time to fulfill those volunteer hours. We can't do it without you!

Sign up Here

All Payments Past Due!

If you're not paid in full by now, please bring a check with you to tonight's pick up- or contact us to let us know when to expect your final payment. 

treasurer@clintonhillcsa.org

Winter Share Host

We are in need of a host for the winter share! The host should ideally live in Fort Greene or Clinton Hill, and have a small out door space such as a porch, or front area in which to hold all the shares during pick up.  They must be able to be on site for two hours on four Saturdays, once a month, starting in November, as well as be able to take a Louis Waite delivery earlier in the day. The host gets a free winter share.  Email me if you're interested, or for more information!


This Week's Share:

  • Kale
  • Corn
  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Peppers
  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Dill
  • Chilies
  • Carrots

Recipes

Late summer is when a lot of produce is in it's prime- especially tomatoes.  It's a good time to make preserves, or fill up your freezer with bounty to last you into the winter.  Personally, I opt for making tomato sauce and freezing it, but you can also just blanch tomatoes, peel them, and freeze them.  They can then later be added to soups, salsas or whatever- and they will keep that sweet summer flavor.  Here's a quick and easy sauce recipe that I use.  You roast the tomatoes with onions and garlic, then let cool and blend!  Or if you want to make it a science- check out this blog on the perfect sauce method from Serious Eats.

Real Simple offers a great tutorial on canning.  Keep the work of your grandma's alive, you'll be thankful in February when everything at the store if from Peru, and isn't tasting that fresh to boot!

Dr. Kitchener's Hot Stuff from Fancy Pantry by Helen Witty

1/4 to 1/3 lb small fresh hot red peppers of any kind

1/2 cup dry sherry

1/2 cup brandy of good quality

1/2 cup fresh lime juice

1/2 tsp salt 

1/4 tsp ground hot red pepper (optional) 

1. Taking due precautions, rinse and drain the peppers. Cut out and discard the stems, being careful to retain the cores and seeds. Slice the peppers roughly into the container of a blender or food processor. 

2. Cover the machine and chop the peppers; gradually add the sherry and brandy, continuing to run the machine until a rough puree is made. Add the lime juice and salt; add the ground red pepper if mild peppers have been used.

3. Scrape the mixture into a clean, dry pint jar. Cover with two layers of cheesecloth, held in place with the band portion of a canning lid. Set in a warm spot in the kitchen and allow to ripen for at least two weeks, better three. 

4. Pour the sauce into a blender and puree. Press it through a fine-meshed sieve and funnel it into a bottle. Cap tightly and store in the refrigerator. It separates a bit; shake before use.  

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 13

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share

  • Lettuce – two heads
  • Sweet Corn
  • Beets
  • Beans
  • Scallions
  • Tomatoes
  • Basil
  • Peppers

From Windflower Farm

Thank you to all who made the trip to our farm last weekend. It was the highlight of my summer. An image or two can be found on our Instagram and Facebook pages.

The Dog Days are coming to a close: vacations are ending, school is getting under way and the hot, humid, buggy weather that ruins summer greens appears to be behind us. Collards, arugula, the various kales and choys, and mustards of all sorts fall victim to the ravages of flea beetles and the hot, dry conditions of August, and by the end of the month we will normally have harvested or tilled under everything from that family of greens. All of this contributes to the farm looking fairly vacant. (Our garlic and onions and many of our carrots, beets, cabbages and potatoes have been harvested and tucked away.) In the meantime, during the last three or four weeks, in a part of our farm set well apart from the location of our early season greens, we have planted a wide assortment of late summer and fall greens. Direct-seeded salad mixes and arugula are emerging nicely under row covers, and transplanted kales, chards, choys and lettuces are enjoying the cooler nights. The planting goes on: just today, in addition to three kinds of lettuce, we planted bok choy, Koji, Tokyo Bekana and two varieties of Swiss chard. And on the transplanting docket for Thursday are purple mizuna and collards. After this August hiatus, an assortment of salad and cooking greens should find their way into your shares for the balance of the season.

Next week’s shares will likely include cilantro, chiles, onions, garlic, tomatoes, bell peppers, lettuce, escarole (or baby choy), and sweet corn (or beans). Kales and Swiss chard will return to your shares the following week. Your fruit share will resume in the second half of September.

Have a great week, Ted 


Farm weekend photos!  Courtesy of Stephen, Distribution Manager


Spotlight on the Core!

Liz Vento  ::: In-Season Treasurer

Liz and her daughter.

Liz and her daughter.

1.  What's your job in the CSA core, and what does that job entail? 

I am a co-treasurer, currently the in-season co-treasurer.  I collect and record payments before sending them to Farmer Ted. Of course there is other stuff, but that's the majority of what I do during the season. 

2.  How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core? 

I have been a member of the CSA since 2006, (with the exception of 2007 when I sent my deposit in too late and didn't make it off the waitlist) and a core member since 2009. I started as a distribution site coordinator and then switched to co-treasurer.

3.  Where did you grow up? 

I grew up in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn.

4.  What do you do in your real life? 

I am a breastfeeding counselor and doctoral student in psychology. 

5.  What's your favorite part of belonging to the Clinton Hill CSA? 

I love walking a few blocks every week to get my vegetables! I also love the flower share.

6.  Veggie you love? How do you cook it? 

I love tomatoes, cabbage, green beans and okra. My partner has taken over the cooking since I returned to school, she makes the best soups. 

7.  What's a veggie you're less crazy about and how do you use it? 

I don't love arugula, but I love to make it into pesto with walnuts, garlic, olive oil and salt. 

8.  Something no one would guess about you? 

I love playing non-competitive group games. Maybe someone would guess that.

9.  If you were a fruit or vegetable what would you be? 

I answered this same survey for the beet 5 years ago, and my answer was blueberry, which happens to be my 2 year old daughter's favorite fruit. 

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 12

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share

  • Tomatoes
  • Lettuce
  • Garlic
  • Onions
  • Cabbage
  • Sweet Corn
  • Carrots
  • Squashes or Melons
  • Peppers or Eggplants
  • Edamame

It's Not too late!

RSVP for the Windflower Farm visit this weekend!

Please use our message board to coordinate ride sharing!

tedblomgren@gmail.com  &  information@clintonhillcsa.org


Fresh Tomato Risotto

Fresh Tomato Risotto

Recipes & Ideas

Tomato Season is here!  

Earlier this week I made fresh tomato risotto, which, if you haven't tried- I would highly recommend.  The Kitchn has a great recipe here.  They also have a article on 11 easy 3 ingredient tomato salads, which I love.  All of them would make great side dishes for a week night meal.

I would also highly recommend this amazing roasted tomato pesto form Oh She Glows. . IF you're ready to turn the oven on.  The heat has broken, so it's not as crippling as it was last week, and this dish is highly satisfying.  Another great thing to do with the oven- is to make baked tomato and eggs for breakfast.  It's especially luxurious for weekend brunch, and goes well with mimosas.  This recipe uses cherry tomatoes- but I have also done it with chopped Romas or Heirlooms.  If using those- I would recommend pre-baking to tomatoes until some of their juice has evaporated off, before adding the eggs.

Serious Eats published this interesting article about Tomato Storage.  It recommends that if you're going to eat your peak-season tomatoes within 24 hours, to leave on the counter- BUT if you're not going to use them for a few days, to put them in the refrigerator.  


In Town, This Weekend

For everyone that's un-able to goto our beautiful farm this weekend, here's a few things that are happening around Brooklyn & Western Long Island this weekend.

Saturday :: in Greenpoint :: ESME is hosting a Mezcal and BBQ Bonanza Event.  Admission is free and there will be delicious treats and drinks for all to sample from 1pm to 6pm.

Saturday  ::  North Williamsburg :: HANGRY GARDEN MARKET :: It's an unconventional food market!  Check out new food trucks, play games like shuffle board, and enjoy their ever-changing art installations. 

Saturday  :: The Navy Yard  :: Local Whisky Tour!  Did you know that delicious Whisky is being made in the Brooklyn Navy Yard?  Tour the Kings County Distillery facility & get a history lesson about all the illegal past whisky making that used to happen in the Navy Yard at the turn of the 19th century.

Saturday :: West Sayville NY :: Sea food festival from 10am - 7pm.  About an hour east on Long Island, get your seafood fix!

 

 

 

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 11

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share

  • Snap Beans
  • Romaine Lettuce
  • Sweet Corn
  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Scallions
  • Tomatoes
  • Red Cabbage
  • Basil or Parsley
  • Squashes or Cucumbers

Carrots & A haiku from Andrea at Windflower farm

Carrots & A haiku from Andrea at Windflower farm

Summer carrot love
Twisting and turning together
Roots defy reason

The News From Windflower Farm

 

At least once every year, and more than that if something interesting like barn-building is going on, I mount the old Woods backhoe onto my John Deere 6400. This weekend's backhoe work had to do with relocating our outhouses to fresh earth, which I do about now every year because our open house takes place at the end of August and Jan likes them to be fresh. And so I spent a good part of the day yesterday, between downpours and flashes of lightning, digging away. And Jan and Nate spent the day re-leveling, cleaning and decorating the newly relocated structures. In total, we relocated three outhouses. The procedure is straightforward: I put the pallet forks on a second tractor, a John Deere 5425, and lifted the outhouses off their old foundations and out of the way. I then dug new holes with the 6400, placing the fresh soil removed from the new holes into the old holes. I then smoothed the soil, sowed grass seeds and mulched with straw. In a month or two, you’ll have few clues that something sat there before. Because there was more fresh soil coming out of the new holes than needed to refill the old ones, I distributed the soil to a new flower bed beneath Jan’s studio windows. I then used the 5425 to set the outhouses in their new locations. And after a few minutes with a level, a pry bar and some shims, the outhouses are ready for another year. As I write, Jan is completing the project with new lighting.

Outhouse relocation marks the beginning of preparations for our open house – an event to which you are all invited. Each year for the past ten or so, more than 100 CSA members from the city come visit the farm and either camp in one of our fields or stay in a nearby B&B. We open our farm to you, as a member of our CSA, because we want you to know where your vegetables, cut flowers, eggs and some of your fruit comes from. We’d like you to have the chance to learn how your shares are grown, and who is actually performing the work. The event takes place over two days. On Saturday, you’ll set up your tents, tour the farm, sample local beers and wines, enjoy a potluck supper (please bring a dish to pass), listen to live music, hang out around a bonfire or play board games, and gaze at the stars made possible by a dark night sky. Please BYOB. On Sunday, we will serve you a farm breakfast comprised of the freshest eggs you’ve ever had, blueberry pancakes and other farm goodies. After breakfast, and after camp has been broken, we’ll tour some neighboring farms. You might visit the Davis Farm, where your eggs are produced. You might visit the Borden farm, makers of an excellent apple cider, and now home to the county’s first robotic milking parlor. There are four vineyards within three miles of here and a Sunday farmers’ market to visit. There is an excellent river to swim in and beautiful, quite roads to bike on. And there is the Washington County Fair, which has carnival rides, fair food, and all kinds of livestock and farm-related exhibitions. Please consider joining us for the weekend.

Have a great Week, Ted


Open House at Windflower Farm:  August 27-28

 

Please RSVP with the number in your party to both the CHCSA & Ted

Please use our message board to coordinate ride sharing!

tedblomgren@gmail.com  &  information@clintonhillcsa.org


Spotlight on the Core!

Katherine Bateman  :::  Distribution Manager

1. What does your job entail? 

I am a distribution manager. This entails greeting the truck when it arrives and coordinating the volunteers to unload it, set up the veggies for pick up and clean up the site after pick up. It also involves greeting members when they come for their share, problem solving issues that may arise on site and liaising with the amazing custodial staff at PS 51.

2. How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core? 

I have been part of the Clinton Hill CSA and the core for the last 3 years. I am now the most senior distribution manager.

3. Where did you grow up? 

I grew up outside of Toronto-- though my family is French Canadian and British.

4. What do you do in your real life? 

I am a middle school teacher, crafter/designer. I am so eager for any opportunity to jump on my bike, run or rock climb.

5. What's your favorite part of belonging to the CHCSA? 

As distribution manager I love developing relationships with the membership over the course of my 7 weeks of coordinating pick up. It is awesome to watch Clinton Hill CSA children going form baby bumps to chatty toddlers. I enjoy meeting the volunteers and being consistently impressed by how professional, dedicated and gregarious our membership is. I also love watching my store of plastic bags dwindle and becoming a temporary stranger at my local grocery store.

6. What's a veggie you love? How do you cook it? 

I LOVE kohlrabi. It is possibly my favorite. I love making a slaw with it (with lemon juice, olive oil and mayo. Add salt and pepper to taste!)

7. Veggie you're not crazy about? How do you use it? 

I don't love spinach. I don't like eating it raw-- it is too waxy for me and it cooks down too much. I tend to freeze it and add it to smoothies.

8. Something no one would guess about you? 

I love mayo. I eat it with as many things as possible, including with white rice. Japanese mayo is my favorite. 

9. If you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be? 

I would be maple syrup. Seriously. That or olive oil. Neither is a veggies or fruit, but I am not great at rules...


Support Local NY Beer, Wine & Booze!

On Myrtle Ave in Clinton Hill a true locals bar opened this summer:  Cardiff Giant.

They pour alcohol, wine & beer made in New York State!  Check them out here!

 

 

 

 

The BEET: Volume 15, Issue 10

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


Call Out to Volunteers!  These past few weeks we have been a bit shorthanded.  Please Sign up!

Reminder:  If you haven't paid your balance for this season- it's past due!  Please bring a check to pick up tonight!  Or mail it to our P.O. box.  Thanks!


This Week's Share:

  • Carrots
  • Potatoes
  • Scallions
  • Tomatoes
  • Basil
  • Squashes
  • Sweet corn
  • Broccoli or Onions
  • Cabbage or Cucumbers

From Windflower Farm - Get to know their team!

Much to our surprise and good fortune, many of the members of our staff keep coming back each year, several for as many as nine, ten and eleven years, representing a significant investment in our farm and a growing reservoir of know-how about how the farm functions. So, to make it a more interesting work experience for them and to make a better farm for all of us, we created a series of coordinating roles. Andrea, who you have probably heard from, is our membership coordinator. She also works on another small farm (to keep it interesting) and runs a micro-size herb farm of her own (to make sure there is never a dull moment). Victoria is our distribution coordinator. Hers is the only position that is not new. She is the mother of two, an avid homesteader and beer maker, and keeps the packing shed interesting with all kinds of word games. We always have a small number of newcomers, and they start by working under Victoria’s supervision in the packing shed. This year’s team includes Mallory, Kristoffer, Dagny and Wyatt. The starting wage on the farm is $12/hour.

Salvador is our weeding coordinator. He is the one who showed up with his brother-in-law one day ten years ago and said, “you really need our help.” And I did! Our farm has been forever improved by his and his family’s presence here. His wife, Candelaria, who works by his side every day, makes incredible tamales. Martin, Salvador’s brother-in-law, is our harvest coordinator. He comes to us from Mexico each year with his wife and Martin Jr., the oldest of his five children. Martin is expanding his own farm in the mountainous country southwest of Mexico City, and we talk a great deal about growing onions and cabbages (his biggest cash crops) and farm economics. They also grow corn, beans and squash, the three sister crops that sustain the family. Sara is our social media coordinator. Her dad’s chickens produce the eggs in your egg share and his maple trees are the source of the syrup that are sometimes in winter shares. She is our chief transplant tractor driver and Jan’s partner in pulling together your flower share. She is also a photographer and potter. Mack coordinates our cooler. She began working here as a kid, just graduated with a fine arts degree from FIT, and is now looking for a job in interior design.

Nate, my oldest son, is our payroll coordinator (which makes him quite popular) and our soil health coordinator. He has embraced cover cropping as the foundation of soil management here (his fields of oats and peas are impressive). Naomi is our delivery coordinator. She is the one that site coordinators get a call from when our truck is stuck behind a double-parked Fresh Direct van and will be late. Jan is my farming partner and wife of 25 years. She is in charge of flowers and serves as the general manager around here.  What is left for me to do, you might ask? Well, much less, of course, but, in delegating these chores I am able to do a better job with my key chore, producing a good harvest. I focus on greenhouse scheduling, field preparation and pest management. No small business survives if its owner cannot build a good team and delegate, and that is what I am trying to do. I plan to farm for another fifteen years or so, but when I leave the farm, I’d like it not to skip a beat.

Have a great week, Ted


Save The Date!  

Windflower Farm Open House Weekend :: August 27 & 28th.  

Everyone is welcome to come visit our farm and stay the night!  (Camping style of course)  Saturday night there is a big pot luck dinner with friends and neighbors, and Sunday morning, Ted & Jan cook up a huge farm style breakfast.  Windflower farm is about a 3 hour drive north of the city just east of Albany.


Recipe Ideas

Cabbage!  While it may not seem like a summer vegetable- it's quite versatile, and pairs up nicely with a lot of popular summer dishes.  (Like Hot Dogs!)  Cabbage can be pickled, fermented, braised, sauteed or eaten raw.  It is also one of the oldest known vegetables, there being documents of Europeans domesticating it around the year 1000 B.C.  Cabbage is in the Brassica family, and is closely related to cauliflower and broccoli.  It's a significant source of vitamins C & K, and B6.

One of the most nutritious things you can do with your cabbage is to ferment it into sauerkraut, or if you're into spice; kimchi.

SAUERKRAUT::  The Kitchn has a great guide here for mason jar sauerkraut.

KIMCHI::  For a simple Kimchi guide, I like this one at cultures for health.  Cultures for health is also a great website for all kinds of fermentation.  They have lots of videos, and starter kits for things like kombucha and kefir.

If you really want to fall down the rabbit hole of fermentation, I would highly recommend this book:  Wild Fermentation, by Sandor Katz.  It's got the basics for every kind of fermented food, with easy recipes, and clear instructions.

BORSCHT::  Cold soup for a hot day!  Cold summer Borscht only gets better the longer it sits in your fridge.  It's a Ukrainian beet & cabbage soup that can be served cold or hot.  Here is a tried and true classic recipe, and if you want to try it before making it, I would highly recommend getting a bowl with a slice of home made bread at Veselka.  Thank goodness they are still around!

COLESLAW::  The Food Lab offers up this in depth guide on making classic creamy slaw, and I'd also like to suggest this more traditional German recipe which does not use mayonnaise, and is very close to the way my grandmother made it.


What are you making with your farm share?

We want to know!  If you have any recipes that you love, and want to share with your CSA community- send them in and I'll share them in the newsletter.

newsletter@clintonhillcsa.org


Spotlight on the Core!

Anne Goelz :: Newsletter Editor

As seen in Rocky Mountain State park this Spring.

As seen in Rocky Mountain State park this Spring.

1. What does your job entail?

Composing the newsletter each week & putting it on our website.  I try to find relevant recipes, information, goings-on for everyone, and offer up insight on the vegetables and other food we get each week.

2. How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core?

3 years with the CHCSA, and 2 years in the core.  I was also a member of the 6th Street CSA in the east village for several years.

3. Where did you grow up?

Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Did you know that “Milwaukee” is Algonquin for “The Good Land?”

4. What do you do in your real life?

I am a Production Designer and Art director for Film and TV.  Currently I’m working on season 3 of “Mozart in the Jungle.”

5. What's your favorite part of belonging to the CHCSA? 

I get a lot of satisfaction knowing that we are helping the local farm movement, and I have loved getting to know my fellow like-minded core members.  It’s really nice to scale down in New York City and be involved in something that ties me to my small neighborhood and yet furthers the larger picture.

6. What's a veggie you love? How do you cook it?

Tomatoes.  I wait all year for late summer tomatoes.  I eat them raw in caprese salad, stewed in Ratatouille, slow roasted in a skillet with eggs, I bread and Fry the green ones, and then before the season ends I buy as many boxes as I can carry to make & can tomato sauce which will get me through the winter.

7. Veggie you're not crazy about? How do you use it?

Eggplant.  I put it in the Ratatouille :)

8. Something no one would guess about you?

One time- I sailed to Antarctica.

9. If you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be?

I’d be an Avocado.  I love trees & guacamole!

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 8

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share

  • Lettuce
  • Swiss chard
  • Red cabbage
  • Bunched red beets
  • Bell peppers
  • Cucumbers
  • Squashes
  • Cilantro or dill
  • White (‘Bianca’) onions
  • Snap Beans
  • Tomatoes

The News from Windflower Farm

Something I especially enjoy about my work as a farmer is the diversity of tasks that I must or get to address every day. So, while the harvest team was harvesting, and the packing team was packing, I spent most of my day on a project with my son Nate. This week we will wrap up a project we started earlier in the year. By the end of the week we’ll have enclosed nearly our entire farm inside an 8’ deer fence. The completion of the project will give me a great deal of relief. Deer do thousands of dollars-worth of damage to our crops every year. You, our CSA shareholders get fewer ears of corn, less squash, lettuce, chard and beets, and fewer sweet potatoes, all because of deer. Our work today was preparatory: we were clearing the fence’s path of trees and limbs and mowing the tall grass. Our tools were brush hogs and chain saws.  Alan Davis, the man whose beautiful chicken flock provides your egg shares, and his crew will actually install the fence tomorrow. Their tools include a post pounder, which makes the job of setting the hundreds of 12’ posts a reasonable one. Our goal is to become deer-proof. We have fenced nearly but not all of our farm. We will be leaving plenty of deer habitat outside our fence. We have left four fields, two blocks of woods and two creeks for the deer and foxes, coyotes, turkeys, woodchucks and myriad other creatures that occupy our neighborhood. But we’ll have safeguarded our efforts against the animals that want to eat your vegetables, and I am relieved. If only preventing insects from eating your vegetables was this easy. Next week Nate and I get to build a new walk-in cooler. I can’t wait!

Have a great week, Ted  


Recipe Ideas

Midway through summer all the squash starts to get overwhelming.  But, with summer squash the possibilities are endless.  Huffington Post published this great article on Yellow Squash: What to do when your sick of Zucchini.  It lists abut 20 unconventional ways to make them into a great meal, or side.

My other personal favorite summertime salad is Classic Nicoise Salad!  Now that Chez Oscar is gone from DeKalb Ave, you're going to have to make your own.  Epicurious has a great recipe here, and Serious Eats breaks down the essential elements, to help you get creative while making this fulfilling dish.

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 7

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share:

  • Two leaf lettuces
  • Green cabbage
  • Swiss chard and kale (your choice)
  • Bunched red beets
  • Cucumbers and squashes
  • Cilantro or dill
  • Yellow onions
  • A few tomatoes

News from Windflower Farm:

More good things are coming in the next couple of weeks: tomatoes are on the rise, and soon you’ll be getting our first snap beans, sweet peppers, chiles, carrots and sweet corn.

We’ve been harvesting garlic this week. Today alone, Nate and I pulled some 7,000 bulbs! I’m feeling it in my lower back, which I am currently medicating with something called a Hop Nosh IPA left by some recent visitors. It looks like a good harvest, as you can see for yourself on our Instagram page. We should have them all indoors by Monday. Nearly everything has benefitted from the rains of the past two weeks, but not garlic, which prefers dry conditions as it matures. We’ve had to skip one or two in every ten because the wrapper leaves were spoiled due to a Fusarium infection. But if we do a good job of curing what we have harvested, the infected outer leaves will dry and can be removed before it spreads. Look for garlic to be in your shares beginning in week nine or ten.

While on the topic of alliums, I’ll mention that we’ve tried something new in the onion department this year that I’m really happy with. We planted Dutch-grown onion sets last fall, just after we planted our garlic. Ordinarily, we would plant onion seeds in the greenhouse in late February and transplant the small plants to the field in late April. We harvested them this week, just ahead of our garlic. We pulled nearly 200 bushels of these midsized yellow onions and tucked them into our greenhouse for curing.

Beets and cabbage are new to your shares this week. What to make? Cole slaw? A borscht? A cold beet soup?  My favorite way to enjoy beets is as a cold side dish or addition to a garden salad. Simply boil them until fork soft, peel the skin off, chop and refrigerate. They make a refreshing, sweet and healthy treat for a hot day. Too many cucumbers? Keep in mind they are nutritional powerhouses, high in vitamins C and A, and along with magnesium, potassium and zinc. Although I can easily eat four cucumbers myself in a week, I understand that you may be experiencing cucumber fatigue. Nate is making sweet refrigerator pickles as I write (see the recipes below, from Rodale’s Organic Life).  

Have a great week! Ted


Bread and Butter Pickles at Windflower Farm

Bread and Butter Pickles at Windflower Farm

Dill Refrigerator Pickles
Yield: 1 quart

5 medium cucumbers
1 tablespoon pickling salt, sea salt, or kosher salt (but not iodized table salt)
1 cup cider vinegar
1 cup water 1 head dill or small bunch dill leaves
1 clove garlic (optional)
3 black peppercorns (optional)

1. For the crunchiest pickles, select firm, dark-green pickling cucumbers that have not started to ripen to white or yellow. Cut them into spears or slices, as desired. To increase the crunchiness, you can sprinkle the cut cucumbers with a couple of tablespoons of salt, let them sit for 2 hours, and then rinse and drain before proceeding, but this step isn't absolutely necessary.

2. Place the dill in the bottom of a clean quart jar, peel and crush the garlic clove (if using), and drop that in along with the peppercorns (if using), then put in the cut cucumber. Mix the salt, vinegar, and water in a separate container, stirring until the salt is dissolved, then pour it over the cucumbers, filling the jar right to the top. Pop on the lid and put the jar in the fridge.

Sweet Refrigerator Pickles
Yield: 1 quart

3 cups sliced cucumbers
1 cup sliced onions
1 clove garlic, peeled and sliced (optional)
1 tablespoon pickling salt, sea salt, or kosher salt
1 cup cider vinegar
1 ¾ cup white sugar or ⅞ cup honey to taste
1 tablespoon whole mustard seeds
1 teaspoon ground turmeric
½ teaspoon celery seed
2 cloves, whole

1. Prepare jar and veggies as for dill pickles. Combine the remaining ingredients in a stainless steel saucepan, bring them to a boil, and simmer until the sugar or honey is dissolved.

2. Put the veggies into the jar and pour the vinegar mixture over them, stirring to make sure all veggies come in contact with it. Cover and refrigerate.


In the News:

There was an interesting article in the NY Times this week:  When Community Supported Agriculture is not what it seems. 

As the article makes clear, these days, there are many more sources for local, organic produce. CHCSA offer top-notch quality, but many of them do not cut out the middle man, which is one of the founding ideas behind CSA's.  We also believe that the other element that brings members back year after year is community--both what Ted offers but also on site. Not everyone values that equally, but it feels like you - our community in Clinton Hill - does, as we have filled our slots, year after year.  Thank you!


Spotlight on the Core!

Sarah Chinn :: Out-of-Season Treasurer

1. What does your job entail?
As out-of-season treasurer, I receive and process deposits for membership, and pre-season payments. I create the records by which we can keep track of member payments, and communicate with members.

2. How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core?
I joined the CSA its second year, and I started as distribution coordinator the following year. I’ve been co-treasurer for about four years.

3. Where did you grow up?
I was born in London and lived there until I was almost 16. My family moved to New York when I was in my teens. I’ve lived in Brooklyn longer than anywhere else so I think of myself as a Brooklynite more than anything else.

4. What do you do in your real life?
I teach English at Hunter College, and I’m chair of the English department.

5. What's your favorite part of belonging to the CHCSA?
I love seeing my neighbors every week — I love the community. Kids who were babies when I first joined (including my own) are now teenagers! I love that we’re supporting a farming family, and that we get fresh fruit and vegetables every week.

6. What's a veggie you love? How do you cook it?
 My favorite vegetable is probably corn: it’s so sweet and delicious! If I'm eating it the night of the CSA, we put it raw into a salad. I love it grilled too. I love all the stone fruit, especially cherries and peaches, and I’m looking forward to its return next year.

7. Veggie you're not crazy about? How do you use it?
Not crazy about bok choy. I like almost all greens, but choy doesn’t do it for me. I put it in the swap box and take extra collards or choy. And I’m not a huge chard fan either, but we make a really delicious tabbouli with thinly sliced chard.

8. Something no one would guess about you?
I’m a secret Candy Crush player.

9. If you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be?
I’d be a dragon fruit (sadly not available through the CSA).

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 6

FULL SHARE & YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


This Week's Share:

  • Leaf Lettuce
  • Cucumbers and squashes
  • Collards
  • Garlic Scapes and onions
  • Your choice between Swiss Chard and Lacinato Kale
  • Hakurei Turnips
  • Purple kohlrabi
  • Bunched Parsley
  • Flower share: Snapdragon, Calendula & Mixed wildflowers
  • Blueberries: Fruit Share

**This is the last week of the fruit share until the fall**


Letter From Windflower Farm:

This week marks the end of the first quarter of the distribution season. It’s the time when cool, early-season vegetables give way to the vegetables of summer. Our tomatoes are beginning. Don’t expect to see many (or any) this week, but they’ll begin to yield in quantity very soon. Our sweet corn is just around the corner, and peppers, red cabbages, garlic and basil, too, will be coming in. This is the beginning of an especially wonderful time of year in the Northeast to be a plant eater! 

Blueberries will be in your fruit shares this week. I suspect that this will be the last week of fruit prior to our midseason break. Pete, our fruit grower, told me that crows have found his blueberry patch - counting more than 80 in one flock – and that they were doing considerable damage. Jan made a delicious pie last weekend with her blueberries and was not surprised at all to learn of the crow’s fondness for them.  

We love collard wraps. Nate has picked out a recipe that appears to use virtually everything in this week’s share all wrapped up in collard leaves - see below. He and I will be using our “steerable cultivator” later today on some new lettuce and broccoli plantings. I’ll post a photo on our Instagram page later today. Please visit our Facebook and Instagram (@windflowerfarm) pages to learn more about the farm. 

Have a great week! Ted   


Recipe Ideas:

Cucumbers Galore!  Cucumbers are a rich source of vitamins A, B, C, D and E, and fresh extracts have recently been show to have both antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.  Research has also shown a connection with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease as well as several cancer types, including breast, uterine, ovarian, and prostate cancers.

Heres a variety of recipes to try out on this diverse, refreshing veggie!

Delicious Smoothies ideas with cucumbers and other summer fruits, and a helpful guide to create your own!

Cool summer Salad: Soba noodle, bok choy & cucumber, from The Kitchn

Like Gazpacho?  Have you tried it with cucumber and mint?  Luna cafe offers a refreshing recipe for these hot and humid summer days.

Cucumber Roll-ups are a great idea for packed lunches, picnics, and party hours d-eourvers.  Try these roll-ups with avocado spread, or pesto & turkey wraps, or these mediterranean flavored ones.

Ditch your sandwich bread for Collard Greens!  Ted is ahead of the curve, as he has been making collard green wraps for years- we get a lot of them throughout the season, and they make great sandwich wrappers!   My personal favorite usually involves Quinoa.


Local Compost Drop-Off @ The Clifton Place Association Garden

Grand Ave Between Clifton Place & Greene Ave


Meet the Core!

Each week we're getting to know one of our CSA core members.  This week features-

Stephen Narloch ::  Distribution Manager

1. What does your job entail? 

I show up early to meet the truck and work with our volunteers to get everything ready for pickup, and later on, clean up.

2. How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core? 

I’m new around here. 2016 is my first year with the Clinton Hill CSA and the core group. In the past I’ve picked up shares from the Clinton Hill CSA for friends on vacation. It’s great to be here on the regular – thanks to all for welcoming me to this great organization!

3. Where did you grow up? 

I’m from Milwaukee, Wisconsin – a great place on a great lake! I’ve been in NYC since 1995 and in Brooklyn since 2001. I currently live in Crown Heights.

4. What do you do in your real life? 

I’m an avid home-brewer, food fermenter, window gardener and project starter (someday I’ll finish!). I work for the City of New York.

5. What's your favorite part of belonging to the CHCSA? 

I really like talking to fellow members at pickups about all the great items in our share – especially the less familiar ones (for me, it’s garlic scapes, so far).  

6. What's a veggie you love? How do you cook it? 

I love radishes. I’ll slice them super thin on my mandolin and quick pickle them for snacks or salads with the great lettuces and other items from the share. Also, kohlrabi: raw, sautéed with garlic/scapes or roasted like broccoli!

7. Veggie you're not crazy about? How do you use it? 

Rhubarb. I actually like it pretty well, but I don’t really know what to do with it other than make desserts with it. I’d appreciate any suggestions.

8. Something no one would guess about you?  

I ran a home-brewing club out of my apartment for a couple years – better living through fermentation!

9. If you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be? 

Kohlrabi, because I’m super versatile and mysterious.

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 5

FULL SHARE & GREEN HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


A Few Reminders:

  • Don't forget to bring your own bags to pick up tonight!  And if you have some extra ones floating around that you can donate- bring those too!  Your neighbors are grateful!
  • Going out of town on a Thursday?  If you can't make it to a pick up one night, for whatever reason, feel free to send someone in your place to pick up your share.  All your friend or relative  has to do is give your name at the sign-in-desk.  Be sure to tell them if you have any extra shares & to bring their own bags.
  • Sign up for your volunteer hours!  
  • Craving CSA Cheese, Bread, Meats and Dried Goods?  Place an order with LewisWaite to receive them with our next delivery!

Upstate Summer Snacking: Pasta Salad & Hudson Cherries

Upstate Summer Snacking: Pasta Salad & Hudson Cherries

Recipe Ideas:

Ted didn't send along the list of what we're getting this week, but I'm guessing it will be more greens, summer squashes, radishes, and tasty radishes.  

Early summer is a great time to make PESTO!  You can use many different kinds of greens instead of Basil as your base.  This past week I made this Kale and Toasted Walnut Pesto from Epicurious, and it was delicious dressing for pasta salad.  It also freezes well, so you can make a lot now, and save some for easy weeknight dinners, or for a special night in the fall when you want to reminisce about this past summer.

Bon Appetit published this great guide for making pesto out of anything!  Experiment with other greens, like cilantro, parsley, arugula - even Broccoli and making pesto, and don't feel limited to the traditional Pine Nuts $$$$, or Walnuts.  Almonds, Macadamia, even Pistachio nuts are good too!  For those of us who are more visual, I found this great Pesto Flow Chart; below.


Get to know your CSA Core!

Part of being involved in the CSA is getting to know your neighbors and community.  Each week we're going to put the spotlight on one of our core members so you can get to know us better.

This week's core member:

Tymberly Canale :: Distribution Manager

1. What does your job entail? 

I meet the truck as it arrives and manage a team of volunteers to help unload the truck and set up the school cafeteria for our CSA. Then we break it all down and clean up at the end of the night. The job requires muscles and humor!

2. How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core? 

I am new to the Clinton Hill CSA and the core group this year but I founded the Sweet Pea CSA in Brooklyn Heights and was a core member of the Southside Williamsburg CSA, so when I moved to the neighborhood, the core group graciously welcomed me. When I worked with Just Food to help set up Sweet Pea CSA, the Clinton Hill CSA was the CSA I visited to see how to run one. It was very organized back in 2006 and still is!

3. Where did you grow up? 

I am from Pittsburgh Pennsylvania and I went to undergrad in St. Louis and grad school in Roanoke, Virginia.

4. What do you do in your real life? 

I am a dance theater performer and adjunct university dance professor. Additionally, I do arts administration work for number of different places. I am also a Brooklyn Botanic Garden certified Master Composter and I oversee my local community garden’s compost bins. Additionally, I’m a single mom to an incredible fourteen year old girl whom I love wholeheartedly.

5. What's your favorite part of belonging to the CHCSA? 

Getting vegetables every week directly from a farm makes my heart go pitter-patter. I love the surprise of it and the challenge to try and use all of it during the week before the stuff wilts. I am a total CSA nerd!

6. What's a veggie you love? How do you cook it? 

I love simply roasting broccoli in the oven with olive oil and garlic.

7. Veggie you're not crazy about? How do you use it? 

Well, I never cooked with bok choy before this season and was surprised by how much I loved it just steamed with nothing else on it. But okra. I don’t even know what to do with that slimy mess.

8. Something no one would guess about you? 

I love to read and am just at the tail end of "The Argonauts" by Maggie Nelson, which is the most brilliant and romantic thing I have read in a long time. I also love poetry and would like to start a regular poetry reading group for people to read a poem they love out loud and want to share with others.

9. If you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be? 

Well, I had the hugest strawberry rhubarb lemonade smoothie today with stuff from my fruit share, so I would have to say I feel like I am that today.

THE BEET: Volume 15, Issue 4

FULL SHARE AND YELLOW HALF SHARE PICK UP TONIGHT

Pick up today: 5pm - 7:30pm at PS 56 on the corner of Gates and Downing


In This Week's BEET:

  1. This week's share
  2. Recipe Ideas
  3. Get to know your CSA Core!
  4. Cool treats in the Neighborhood!

This Week's Share:

  • Lettuces
  • Dinosaur Kale
  • Radishes
  • Purple Kohlrabi
  • Arugula
  • Garlic Scapes
  • Onions
  • Cucumbers
  • Summer Squash
  • Potted Herbs
  • Strawberries & Rhubarb

Recipe Ideas

Those of you that are new to the CSA may not have used Kohlrabi before- I hope you're excited to get to know this incredibly versatile, hearty spring vegetable.  To me, it's like a cousin of Jicama- which is king of like a turnip mixed with an apple.  Kohlrabi is part of the brassica family, and can be eaten both raw and cooked.  

When peeled and sliced they make great vessels for any kind of dip.  Or you can also turn them into french fries and then dip them.  :)

Kohlrabi works well in most coleslaw recipes, like this one with shredded carrots.  Or you can replace the green papaya with Kohlrabi to make this tasty Thai Salad, Tom Sum.

Here's a few great Salads you should be making with all our greens right now:

Strawberry, Spinach, Quinoa and Goat Cheese Salad.  You can youse any kind of greens in this- they're all delicious.  And I prefer Pecans to Almonds- Walnuts would be nice too.

And for the Kale lovers out there- have you tried this Kale and Pecorino Salad?  It's got that crunchy, salty, and a little sweet thing going on, that really fills you up.


Get to know your CSA Core!

Part of being involved in the CSA is getting to know your neighbors and community.  Each week we're going to put the spotlight on one of our core members so you can get to know us better.

This week's core member:

Roxanne Earley :: Outreach Coordinator

1. What does Your job entail? 

I work with other members of the core to conduct pre-season outreach to our membership, and during the season I coordinate CSA members to help plan special events like our Halloween Potluck. I also conduct our annual survey to help us make sure we improve the CHCSA every year. 

2. How long have you been part of the CSA? Of the core? 

This is my second year on the core.

3. Where did you grow up? 

I am originally from a small town on the Chesapeake Bay in Maryland. 

4. What do you do in your real life? 

I work as the Director of Land Use and Planning for a New York City Council member. 

5. What's your favorite part of belonging to the CHCSA? 

I love learning about new veggies, and playing an important role in local food systems. I greatly value being a part of something that is more sustainable for the planet, my region, and my community as well as helping me have a healthier diet!

6. What's a veggie you love? How do you cook it? 

I can't get enough of our tomatoes and spinach. I love potatoes too. 

7. Veggie you're not crazy about? How do you use it? 

I've never been a huge fan of turnips, but I've been learning about new ways to serve them in soups, mashed, and roasted with other root veggies and herbs. Butter always helps. 

8. Something no one would guess about you?

I will try to pickle anything once. 

9. If you were a fruit or a vegetable, what would you be? 

Probably a radish. Rosy on the outside, but deep down a little sassy and spicy


In The Neighborhood

Summer is in full stride, and one of the best things about summer is ICE CREAM!  Our neighborhood grocer/ eatery, Mekelburgs, has collaborated with Ample Hills to make Babka Ice cream!  Check it out!

Have you been to The Good Batch yet?  On Fulton at the corner of Saint James, this bakery has a full menu of Ice Cream Sandwiches, and other cool treats for a hot day.